Meal Planning with Gestational Diabetes

Meal Planning with Gestational Diabetes

meal planning with gestational diabetesGestational diabetes is a condition in which women without previously diagnosed diabetes exhibit high blood glucose levels during pregnancy. It is an often complicated and intimidating condition to deal with, and requires following a strict diet plan to ensure the safety of both mother and child.

Uncontrolled gestational diabetes can put a mother at risk for a myriad of complications including pre clampsia, jaundice, low blood sugar, and delivery complications. Some babies born to mothers with unchecked gestational diabetes can grow larger than a normal baby and cause complications for both mother and baby during delivery.

A controlled diet is often the first step to controlling gestational diabetes. Every pregnant woman should follow certain guidelines when eating for two, but for women with gestational diabetes it is especially important to follow a healthy dietary plan. Most doctors will recommend eating three moderately sized meals per day with two or three snacks dispersed throughout the day. Meals should include whole grains, fresh fruits, lean proteins, and lots of vegetables.

Carbohydrates will need to be heavily monitored and limited. Carbohydrates are not just limited to baked goods, though. A lot of foods are high in carbohydrates such as breads, cereals, pasta, potatoes, fruit, and milk. For pregnant women with gestational diabetes, it is a good idea to plan out your meals ahead of time. This will help you keep on track with what you are eating, and also ensure that you do not skip meals or snacks. Skipping a meal or snack can be detrimental to keeping your blood glucose levels in check.

Here are some ideas to help you plan your meals:

Breakfast:
Whole grains such as steel cut oatmeal, bran cereal, or two slices of whole wheat toast. A protein such as a hard boiled or scrambled egg, or a tablespoon of peanut butter.  A small handful of fresh berries or half a grapefruit.

Example: One cup of hot bran cereal topped with a small handful of fresh berries and vanilla almond milk.

Mid-Morning Snack:
Snacks should be mostly protein based. Try to stay away from chips or cookies.

Example: A handful of raw almonds or six saltine crackers with a tablespoon of peanut butter.

Lunch:
One ounce of protein and lots of fresh veggies make a delicious, satisfying, and gestational diabetic friendly lunch.

Example: Tossed salad with one ounce of grilled chicken and two tablespoons of low fat dressing.

Afternoon Snack:
Fresh cut veggies make a great healthy and filling snack.
Example: One cup of baby carrots with two tablespoons of hummus. (Try using a low sodium brand or making your own)

Dinner:
Three ounces of a lean protein of your choice, ½ to one cup of starch, and as many vegetables as you can eat. You can include a small amount of fat, such as one tablespoon of margarine or two tablespoons of a low fat salad dressing.

Example: Three ounce turkey breast with bread crumbs served with half a cup of cooked quinoa with mushrooms and mixed vegetables sautéed in one tablespoon of olive oil. Try a baked apple with oats and cinnamon for dessert.

Before Bed Snack:
It is highly recommended for expectant mothers to eat a before bed snack. It will help keep your blood glucose levels maintained while you are sleeping, and can sometimes help prevent morning sickness.

Example: One slice of whole wheat bread topped with a sliced hard-boiled egg.

Eating for two with gestational diabetes can be filling and enjoyable. By following recommended meal plans, you can ensure a healthy mom and baby.

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Is there Life After Gestational Diabetes?

Is there Life After Gestational Diabetes?

life after gestational diabetesGestational diabetes is a frightening thing to experience. Many women are so focused on dealing with the day-to-day aspects of it for themselves and their babies to even contemplate life after gestational diabetes. Do you go back to the way you were doing things before? Or, is necessary to make changes now in order to avoid type 2 diabetes in the future? The truth, is usually somewhere in the middle. Keep these things in mind as you consider life after gestational diabetes.

Creates Higher Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Later in Life

Women who have gestational diabetes are, statistically, more likely to develop it later in life. It may be related to commonalities in symptoms between gestational and type 2 diabetes and a side effect of dietary and fitness habits. The fact remains, though, that your risks are greater if you don’t make significant, habitual changes in the way you eat.

Good Habits Developed While Managing Gestational Diabetes can Help

The positive habits you develop while managing your gestational diabetes will help you keep your blood sugar stable during life after gestational diabetes. It really doesn’t get much better than that for anyone attempting to avoid developing full-blown diabetes later in life.

Weight Loss is Essential

Even during your life after gestational diabetes, it’s critical to lose weight, at least some, if you want to prolong your good health, and prevent type 2 diabetes from becoming a major factor in your future. The good news, though, is that you don’t have to take off a lot of weight. Loosing as little as five percent of your body weight can have a profound impact on your overall health and for stabilizing your blood glucose levels — especially when done in conjunction with a diet that is blood-sugar friendly.

Incorporate Fitness Into Your Daily Routine

It doesn’t take a lot of fitness, either, to accomplish your health and fitness goal for a full and healthy life after gestational diabetes. In fact, 30 minutes per day or less of physical fitness is the perfect start. It doesn’t have to be strictly dedicated to boring exercise routines either.

You can spend that time taking the stairs instead of the elevator at work, parking farther away at the grocery story, window-shopping at the downtown mall, chasing your children around the yard, climbing trees, dancing, gardening, doing household chores. It’s about moving, adding a little bit of pep to your step, and getting your heart rate up more than anything else. What can you do to get your blood pumping that doesn’t feel like boring old exercises?

Life after gestational diabetes is just that, life. You get out of it what you put into it. Don’t spend it pining over the things you shouldn’t eat or drink. Focus on the wide world of foods and drinks that are available to you and make the most of every moment you have with your precious little one. That is what really makes life after gestational diabetes so very worthwhile.

Suggested Further Reading View This Book!

 

Diabetic Pregnancy Test

Diabetic Pregnancy Test – What Does it All Mean?

Women who are pregnant should go through a diabetic pregnancy test between weeks 24 and 28 of their pregnancy though, under certain circumstances, your physician may order the screening earlier during pregnancy. The purpose of the diabetic pregnancy test is to determine whether or not you have a condition known as gestational diabetes.

What is the Diabetic Pregnancy Test?

The test is fairly simple. You’ll be given a syrupy drink that tastes like a super-sweet orange soda. This drink contains 50g of glucose that is quickly absorbed into the blood. After an hour, you’ll have blood drawn from your arm and that blood will be tested to see how quickly the body metabolizes the glucose.

A follow-up diabetic pregnancy test, also referred to as a glucose tolerance test, is usually ordered if your glucose levels are greater than 130mg/dL. The follow-up test will require you to fast (eat no food) prior to taking the test and is often administered early in the morning as a result.

This diabetic pregnancy test is more involved and results in four blood draws over a three-hour period of time. If the results of at least two of the four blood draws are abnormal, the diagnosis is one of gestational diabetes.

What does it mean to have Gestational Diabetes?

When the results of your diabetic pregnancy test indicate gestational diabetes your doctor will then determine if dietary changes should be adequate to help you recover or if more direct intervention is necessary. Early in pregnancy, most women can control blood sugar levels with dietary chances and exercises. As the pregnancy progresses and hormones begin to build up, more direct intervention in the form of pills or insulin shots may be required.

The goal of the diabetic pregnancy test is to get your blood sugar levels under control so that you can avoid certain complications that may result from high blood sugar including high birth weight in the baby, high bilirubin levels, extra red blood cells, and low blood calcium levels for the baby.

Are there Other Concerns Regarding Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes affects about 18 percent of pregnant women. Some women, depending on family history, weight, age, pregnancy history, and ethnic group; are more susceptible to developing this condition. According to the CDC, women who have gestational diabetes are at an increased risk (35-60 percent increase) of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 to 20 years. Education is critical in avoiding this outcome, which is another reason the diabetic pregnancy test is so import — to serve as a warning ahead of the fact.

Even if your diabetic pregnancy test determines that you have gestational diabetes, it isn’t a guarantee that you’ll eventually develop type two diabetes. It is a sign, however, that now is a good time to begin making changes in your diet and fitness routine to reduce that risk. Start following a diabetic friendly diet while pregnant and continue following the diet afterwards to reduce your risks of developing diabetes and the complications that often go along with it.

MATHEA FORD-REGISTERED DIETITIAN AND AUTHOR

Diabetic Pregnancy Test

Ways To Prevent Gestational Diabetes

Prevent Gestational Diabetes

prevent gestational diabetesAs more and more pregnant women are being diagnosed with gestational diabetes, people are asking if there are ways in order to prevent gestational diabetes. Simply speaking, there are no guarantees with regard to the prevention of gestational diabetes.  After all the focus on gestational diabetes is intervention and monitoring rather than prevention. If you are at high risk for developing gestational diabetes, then there is no sure way to prevent gestational diabetes.

However, this does not mean that you just have to accept your fate and not do anything in order to prevent gestational diabetes. While you can’t change your family history of type 2 diabetes or your, remember that there are modifiable risk factors so that you can lessen your chances of getting gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Here are some of the things that you can do in order to help prevent gestational diabetes:

Eat healthy foods-Prevent Gestational Diabetes

Although this piece of advice applies to all pregnant women, those who are at risk for developing gestational diabetes should watch out for the foods that they eat to help prevent gestational diabetes. Your goal to prevent gestational diabetes is to keep your blood glucose within normal and stable levels throughout the day. Avoid foods that have a high glycemic index, such as pasta, flour, potatoes, and sugar. You can eat them, but in very small and controlled amounts. Instead, eat more protein-rich foods like chicken, dark green leafy vegetables, and seafood if you want to prevent gestational diabetes. You may eat fruits, but avoid commercial fruit juices since they contain artificial sweeteners that might shoot up your blood glucose levels.

Exercise-Prevent Gestational Diabetes

Physical activity is important even if you are pregnant, and more so if you want to prevent gestational diabetes. Remember that right after exercising, blood glucose levels considerably drop, hence making it an effective way to prevent gestational diabetes. You don’t have to do heavy exercises in order to keep your blood sugar levels stable. In fact, you have to make sure that you only engage in light exercises since you are pregnant. Light exercises can already work well to prevent gestational diabetes. Such exercises include walking around the block and even doing light household chores. Just make sure that you monitor your heart rate while exercising.

Maintain your weight-Prevent Gestational Diabetes

While you will certainly gain weight during pregnancy, remember that this weight gain should be kept under control to prevent gestational diabetes. Your should have regular check-ups with your obstetrician to know the right weight for your month of pregnancy. Obesity is linked to gestational diabetes as it is one of the modifiable risk factors of that condition. Therefore, planning your meals accordingly and exercising regularly can help maintain your weight within the normal range and help prevent gestational diabetes.

Stop smoking-Prevent Gestational Diabetes

Smoking is another risk factor that is linked to gestational diabetes. If you are a smoker, perhaps it is high time that you consider giving it up for the sake of your baby and to prevent gestational diabetes. Not only will it hasten the development of gestational diabetes, but it might also have some detrimental effects on your baby. Quit now before it affects you and your baby.

Although there are no guarantees in totally avoiding gestational diabetes, knowing how to prevent gestational diabetes through lifestyle changes will surely help you in managing your condition.

If you have found yourself with gestational diabetes, then please read all my published books on gestational diabetes Search on Amazon for “Baby Steps for Gestational Diabetes”, you will find my book series there, Thanks Mathea Ford RD/LD

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Figuring Out the Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

signs of gestational diabetesGestational diabetes is a condition that happens only to pregnant women during their period of pregnancy. The women who are afflicted with gestational diabetes have high blood glucose levels during pregnancy, most especially during the third trimester. Women who are pregnant should watch out for the signs of gestational diabetes, especially if they are at high risk for developing the disease. Furthermore, the signs of gestational diabetes might not only become apparent on the mother, but also on the baby.

Causes and risk factors of gestational diabetes-Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes happens during pregnancy because the placenta of the pregnant woman releases hormones that help in the growth and development of the baby. Unfortunately, these very hormones also block the action of the insulin from the mother, making the insulin receptors resistant. Because of insulin resistance, the mother’s need for insulin grows, resulting to higher blood glucose levels in the blood and the manifestations of the signs of gestational diabetes.

There are certain women who are at risk for developing signs of gestational diabetes. For instance, women who are over the age of 30 have higher risk for developing the signs of gestational diabetes in contrast to those who are less than 30 years old at the time of pregnancy. A family history of type 2 diabetes and obesity can also put you at risk. Those who had gestational diabetes during their previous pregnancies also have higher chances of getting the signs of gestational diabetes in the current pregnancy. It also appears that Indians, Vietnamese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Middle Eastern women are more prone to gestational diabetes than other cultural groups.

Signs of gestational diabetes on the mother

The signs of gestational diabetes as they manifest on the mother are similar to the signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes, although these are mild and might even be absent. If the signs of gestational diabetes are present, the mother usually feels having increased thirst, appetite, and urination, fatigue, blurred vision, and frequent infection. The only sure way to know if you have the signs of gestational diabetes or not is to subject yourself to routine pregnancy screenings and glucose tolerance tests.

Gestational diabetes on the baby-Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

The reason why the signs of gestational diabetes are being controlled is because it can have adverse effects on the baby. A baby with a mother who is a gestational diabetic can grow larger than the acceptable birth weight because too much sugar crosses the placental barrier from the mother to the baby. This can make labor and delivery more difficult, and might necessitate a Caesarean section on the part of the mother.

In addition, your baby might also manifest signs of type 2 diabetes after being born. The baby might also have problems with low blood sugar immediately after birth and jaundice, so he or she must be monitored in the neonatal intensive care unit. As your baby grows older, he or she is at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes as well.

Therefore, early detection of the signs of gestational diabetes is important for prompt intervention. Treatment for the signs of gestational diabetes includes possible oral medications, diet and nutrition lifestyle changes, constant monitoring of blood glucose levels and exercise.

See the Gestational Diabetes Meal Planner that I developed by CLICKING HERE!

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1800 Calorie Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational diabetes is a disease that poses significant challenges to both the mother and the developing baby. This condition can be managed with lifestyle and diet modifications. One of the most reliable and recommended diet modification plans is the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet. This diet helps to maintain low glucose levels in the mother’s body, accelerates metabolism and may help the mother lose weight. Pregnant mothers who have gestational diabetes should stick to this health diet to minimize any serious diabetes related conditions.

About the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet plan

1800 calorie gestational diabetes dietThis diet plan gives a specific amount of calories that a mother should take each day to control gestational diabetes. As the name suggests, a mother should take 1800 calories each day. The 1800 calories are comprised of 50% carbohydrates (900 calories), 30% fats (540 calories) and 20% proteins (360 calories). This meal plan aims at reducing glucose or carbohydrates consumed by a pregnant mother suffering from the condition. Additionally, it encourages low fat intake and high fiber intake.

Carbohydrates-1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

The 1800 diet plan requires a pregnant mother to have three or four servings of meals rich in carbohydrates. One or two servings should be snacks taken between meals. A good example of one serving of carbohydrates is a slice of bread, a cup of soup, 1/3 cup of pasta or rice, a small fruit, a half cup of canned fruits, a cup of leafy vegetables, a half cup of starchy vegetables and a cup of milk.

Fats-1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

For this type of diet, fats should contribute less than sixty grams or 540 calories daily. A mother should focus on beneficial fats like olive oil, canola oil, peanut or soybean oils. Fried foods should be avoided at all costs because they contain high amounts of trans fats. Butter and fatty meats should also be avoided because they are high in saturated fats. However, a mother should not cut fats all in all. The brain requires omega-3 fatty foods for development. In general, two tablespoons of vegetable oil are sufficient. The rest of the fat calories can be obtained from lean meat, eggs, fish and dairies.

Proteins-1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

2 or 3 servings of protein daily are sufficient to manage gestational diabetes. A mother should make sure that one serving of protein has fish, poultry or meat. Intake of proteins should be spread out throughout the day, just like carbohydrates, because proteins help in managing post-meal blood glucose. One serving of protein can either be one egg or 2 tablespoons of peanut butter or a half cup of beans.
The 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet requires a mother to burn up energy. As such, it is vital for a mother to jog, walk, cycle, exercise bicycling or dance to burn up energy. Maintaining an 1800 calorie diet and exercising requires discipline. When the two are observed, it becomes easy to manage gestational diabetes and to shed unnecessary weight. The advantage of the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet is that a mother gets to enjoy all types of good foods but in limited quantities. The diet plan keeps the body healthy and the taste buds happy.

I have a plan that conforms closely to the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet it is my plan for 2000 calories.  Many OB’s subscribe 2000 or 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet but they are close in calories as long as they are managed.

For meal planning for gestational diabetes click here 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

 

I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

i have gestational diabetesGestational diabetes has become a common problem among pregnant woman now days due to inactive lifestyles and unhealthy food habits. Not many people realize, if such conditions are not controlled in the initial stage, they can lead to great health complications in the future. Without amiss, it should be noted that bringing small changes in the diet can help you get over your condition in a very smooth and subtle way.

Here are some general dietary guidelines for those looking for an answer to:

I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

Eat Variety Of Foods

Although, a pregnant woman is always expected to eat a nutritional diet, it becomes all the more important when she is suffering from gestational diabetes. Make sure you create a balanced gestational diabetes diet chart or get a gestational diabetes diet meal plan to ensure that you are taking right amount of nutrients at the right time. According to dietitians and experts, it is always advised to include at least three small-size meals and four snacks every day.
Include Right Amount Of Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are good for your body if you take them in the right quantity. Eating a diet rich in carbs will ensure that your body is getting all the necessary nutrients required for the growth and development of your fetus. Also, a carb managed diet is also beneficial in controlling the effects of gestational diabetes. Include whole grain cereals, fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet. Spread the carbohydrate intake evenly into 3-4 servings throughout the day.

Don’t Ever Skip Meals

A lot of women have a habit of skipping breakfast to maintain weight. This is absolutely wrong and skipping meals actually adds to weight gain. It is important to understand that your body has certain needs that need to be fulfilled at the right time. Skipping meals is not an option at all! You should be consistent about your meals and prepare a proper gestational diabetes meal plan to make sure that you are eating the right amount of food. It will keep your blood sugar in control and make you feel more energetic throughout the day. I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

Include High-fiber and Protein Rich Foods

Most women think, I have gestational diabetes, so I should start eating in control.  Hence, they start compromising with their daily nutritional diet. It is imperative to know that most of your body is made of proteins and thus you should never miss on including good amount of protein in your diet. On the other hand, eating high-fiber food is also good as it helps to maintain your blood sugar level during gestational diabetes. Include fresh fruits, vegetables, cereals, dried peas, legumes and beans in your diet. Spread them evenly into three-four meals to get the maximum benefit of each. I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

Limit Your Intake Of Artificial Drinks

Artificial drinks such as soda, flavored teas, and artificial fruit juices can play havoc to your gestational diabetes problem. Such drinks can immediately increase your blood sugar level, creating complications for you and your baby. Consult your doctor on using artificial drinks such as juices and sweeteners if you don’t have any other option. Apart from this, you can focus more on fresh fruit juices, decaffeinated tea, and water. I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

We hope these tips would have got you the answer for your query, “I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?” Keep in mind all these tips and you will be able to cope up with your gestational diabetes condition with ease.

If you still have any doubt on meal plans, simply visit my page on gestational diabetes diet meal plans and we can provide a great resource to your meal planning. 

See it by clicking here! I Have Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes Diet

gestational diabetes diet

gestational diabetes diet

FREE EBOOK

 

First things first, I want you to have 3 of my dinner recipes for gestational diabetes FREE and I created an Ebook on managing gestational diabetes that I want you to have FREE as well.  Go to the green box to the right and I will email it to you.

Now, many things come into play when you find out you have gestational diabetes, I know, I had it twice.  Outcomes today are just fine.  But I want you to understand why I created the Ebook I am giving out for free and why I created “Gestational Diabetes Diet Meal Plan and Recipes”  you see over here on the left.  I really want to give back to all of you who are going through emotional times with this condition.  I found that the support from my OB was horrible so I wanted to create this meal planning book to be a source so no woman is lost and on an island with this condition.

Get the FREE stuff and then see what you think about grabbing the meal plan and recipe book!

This condition can be a challenge and among all of these changes, the health of the baby growing within you is the biggest concern, and the health of the baby can sometimes become compromised when gestational diabetes is factored into the equation. In most cases, gestational diabetes can be treated through a healthy diet, gestational diabetes diet, though in some cases medication is required to keep insulin levels under control. Regardless, gestational diabetes is something that could have a future impact on the health of you and your child later in life if it is not treated properly.

What Causes Gestational Diabetes?

During pregnancy, sometimes the body becomes more resistant to insulin. This leaves excess levels of glucose floating around in the bloodstream. While most women never experience any symptoms of gestational diabetes, there are some risks to the baby if it is left unchecked. Not only can the baby gain too much weight–particularly in the upper body, but gestational diabetes can also lead to weight problems later in life for the child. Untreated gestational diabetes also can cause a baby to be born with extremely low blood sugar levels, as their pancreas will be producing too much insulin at birth. This can lead to convulsions, coma, and even death.

What Are The Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes?

Most times, gestational diabetes is asymptomatic in women. In some cases, however, symptoms include increased thirst, increased urination, blurred vision, increased fatigue, weight gain, and nausea or vomiting. They are often mild and go unnoticed during pregnancy, however, as they are often attributed to pregnancy itself. It is usually diagnosed through routine screening during pregnancy–sometime between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. This is done with a glucose test starting with a one hour then a three hour if unclear.

How Is Gestational Diabetes Treated?

In most cases, gestational diabetes is treated through diet, gestational diabetes diet. The gestational diabetes diet is more like a lifestyle plan than a diet. It does not involve deprivation or weight loss–rather it is a balanced eating plan which encourages intake of healthy foods and eliminating bad ones. The gestational diabetes diet involves eating 3 small, balanced meals per day and at least 1 snack, sometimes 2-4 snacks depending on the plan. Meals should be high in lean protein and dietary fiber and low in certain types of carbohydrates and sugars. It involves carefully reading labels and avoiding foods that are laden with carbs and sugars.

The Gestational Diabetes Diet In A Nutshell

Only a small percentage of women with gestational diabetes will need medication to keep the disease under control. By following the gestational diabetes diet, most women can keep their blood glucose levels within a normal range.

* If eating carbohydrates, choose high fiber, whole grain carbohydrates in favor of less healthy carbs.
* Eat 3-5 servings of vegetables each day and 2-4 servings of fruit. Choose whole fruits in favor of fruit juices and sauces as they are full of sugar.
* Eat 4 servings a day of low fat cheese and dairy. Skim milk, low fat yogurt, and hard cheeses are good options.
* Eat 2-3 servings of lean protein per day. This includes meat, nuts, beans, and eggs. 2-3 ounces per serving is sufficient, and avoid fattier forms of protein.
* Some fats are good. Don’t completely cut fat from your diet, but avoid saturated fats and oils if possible.

If your doctor gives you the okay for exercise, thirty minutes of moderate exercise each day has also been shown to help reduce insulin resistance. Walking is a great way to exercise without putting too much impact on pregnancy-stressed joints and is considered relatively safe even late into pregnancy.

Gestational diabetes is one of the most common pregnancy-related illnesses. Many women are completely unaware they have gestational diabetes until they are screened for it later in pregnancy. In most cases, simply eating a healthy, balanced diet will keep the disease under control. A gestational diabetes diet is not one of deprivation and restriction–rather, it is a healthier way to live and a good way to balance yours and your baby’s nutritional needs.

For more on planning your gestational diabetes treatment and diet plan please sign up for my email list and get my FREE EBOOK on  gestational diabetes. 

And for more on an actual meal plan for gestational diabetes please purchase my book on Amazon below, Mathea Ford RD/LD.. USA   OR a downloadable pdf file here $19.99

 

Gestational Diabetes Diet Meal Plan-How to Get Started

Gestational diabetes refers to a case where diabetes is recognized during pregnancy. It is common to about 7% of all pregnancies. The diabetes arises during the second half of the pregnancy and goes way after the baby is born. The diabetes may have further complications if not treated during pregnancy.

Chances of Getting Gestational Diabetes

The chances of getting gestational diabetes are greater if one is overweight, if she had gestational diabetes before, if you have a relative(parent, brother, and sister with type 2 diabetes), if one has ever given birth to a child weighing more than 9 pounds, and she is an American Indian, African American, a Pacific Islander American, and Hispanic/Latina.

How Gestational Diabetes Diet Meal Plan Works

gestational diabetes diet meal planModifying the diet is the first step that a mother that has the disease should emulate towards when treating the condition. This is essential in maintaining the blood sugar level at a normal range while still taking a healthy diet. Gestational diabetes diet meal plan is done by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in the diet. This is because carbohydrates are digested to produce glucose, a core factor in fueling the body and nourishing the developing fetus. However, the glucose levels must be controlled so that they stay at a level that is within target.

The following measures should be taken in order to keep glucose levels in control:

Plan the Meals-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

One can maintain blood sugar levels by eating 3 regular meals in a day and 2 to 4 snacks thorough the day. The meals and the snacks must be balanced and more so in the amount of carbohydrates and calories they contain.

Eat a Good Breakfast-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

One must ensure that she eats a good breakfast because the levels of glucose are usually unstable in the morning. However, one must limit carbohydrate and fruit juice intake and eat proteins instead.

Increase Your Fiber Intake-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

This should include vegetables, beans, peas, legumes and whole grain breads should make up a large portion of your diet.

Limit Your Milk and Sugary Beverage Intake-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

Usually, milk has high lactose (simple sugar) content and must thus be limited to all the mothers that are working to manage gestational diabetes. One should look for additional sources of calcium and additionally avoid fruit juices and soda because they contain a high level of glucose.

Effects of a gestational diabetes meal plan on the child

Glucose crosses the placenta from mother to baby to meet the energy needs of the developing baby. If mother’s blood glucose levels are raised, a greater amount of glucose crosses the placenta to the baby. To manage this extra amount of glucose, the baby produces more insulin. This can cause excessive growth and fat in the baby. If mom’s blood glucose levels continue raised, the baby size may be larger than normal. Following delivery, the baby might experience low blood glucose levels, mostly if the mother’s blood glucose levels were higher before the birth. Gestational diabetes can be monitored and treated with a gestational diabetes diet meal plan and if well controlled, the risks are greatly reduced.

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What Will My Baby Weigh With Gestational Diabetes?- Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Because gestational diabetes is a condition affecting pregnant women, this condition can also affect the babies of these women. As such, this might pose several complications for the baby, including increased birth weight, labor difficulties, hypoglycemia after birth, and risk for developing diabetes later on in life.

“Big” Baby-Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Remember that glucose can cross the placental barrier, and too much glucose can make your baby fat. One of the complications that babies can have if gestational diabetes remains uncontrolled is macrosomia or a big baby. Macrosomia is defined as having a birth weight of 4500 grams or more. That translates to a weight of 9 pounds and 14 ounces, when the normal birth weight is only around 3400 grams.

Baby Weight With Gestational DiabetesAs a result of the weight of the baby, this might further lead to several complications. If the baby achieves this weight at around the seventh week of pregnancy, this might prompt obstetricians to deliver the baby prematurely since staying in the womb for a longer period of time poses some danger to the mother, such as possible uterine rupture. The baby will then have to be placed inside an incubator since his lung surfactants have not yet fully matured. Baby weight with gestational diabetes is directly related to blood sugar control in the mother.

If the baby reaches full term, the huge birth weight can still pose a problem on labor and delivery. Labor may be difficult since the baby will probably not be able to pass through the vaginal canal. Hence, Caesarean section would be recommended. If the mother pushes through with normal spontaneous delivery, there is a risk for the baby to have shoulder dystocia or shoulder fracture. Usually, the baby’s head is the biggest part of his body. However, for macrosomic babies, the shoulders become wider than the head, thus not being able to pass through swiftly into the birth canal. Although the shoulder fracture can easily heal because the babes bones are still soft and not yet fully formed, improper alignment can lead to bone defects as the baby grows older.

Other Complications-Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Aside from possible injuries during delivery, the baby can also suffer from hypoglycemia immediately after delivery. The baby has gotten used to high glucose levels inside the womb. As a result, his pancreas responds by producing high levels of insulin to use up all the glucose coming from the mother. When the baby is born, the pancreas will still continue to produce high amounts of insulin as it still takes some time to get used to the outside environment. As a result, the baby can suffer from hypoglycemia or low blood sugar during his first few days of life. This should be carefully monitored by health care providers.

Studies also show that babies borne out of gestational diabetic mothers have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus later on in life. However, if you control your blood sugar properly during pregnancy, this risk could be lessened. Therefore, proper treatment and control of gestational diabetes is very important.

Learn more about the complications of gestational diabetes for both mothers and babies through our EBOOK and newsletter.

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