Gestational Diabetes Diet

gestational diabetes diet

gestational diabetes diet

FREE EBOOK

 

First things first, I want you to have 3 of my dinner recipes for gestational diabetes FREE and I created an Ebook on managing gestational diabetes that I want you to have FREE as well.  Go to the green box to the right and I will email it to you.

Now, many things come into play when you find out you have gestational diabetes, I know, I had it twice.  Outcomes today are just fine.  But I want you to understand why I created the Ebook I am giving out for free and why I created “Gestational Diabetes Diet Meal Plan and Recipes”  you see over here on the left.  I really want to give back to all of you who are going through emotional times with this condition.  I found that the support from my OB was horrible so I wanted to create this meal planning book to be a source so no woman is lost and on an island with this condition.

Get the FREE stuff and then see what you think about grabbing the meal plan and recipe book!

This condition can be a challenge and among all of these changes, the health of the baby growing within you is the biggest concern, and the health of the baby can sometimes become compromised when gestational diabetes is factored into the equation. In most cases, gestational diabetes can be treated through a healthy diet, gestational diabetes diet, though in some cases medication is required to keep insulin levels under control. Regardless, gestational diabetes is something that could have a future impact on the health of you and your child later in life if it is not treated properly.

What Causes Gestational Diabetes?

During pregnancy, sometimes the body becomes more resistant to insulin. This leaves excess levels of glucose floating around in the bloodstream. While most women never experience any symptoms of gestational diabetes, there are some risks to the baby if it is left unchecked. Not only can the baby gain too much weight–particularly in the upper body, but gestational diabetes can also lead to weight problems later in life for the child. Untreated gestational diabetes also can cause a baby to be born with extremely low blood sugar levels, as their pancreas will be producing too much insulin at birth. This can lead to convulsions, coma, and even death.

What Are The Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes?

Most times, gestational diabetes is asymptomatic in women. In some cases, however, symptoms include increased thirst, increased urination, blurred vision, increased fatigue, weight gain, and nausea or vomiting. They are often mild and go unnoticed during pregnancy, however, as they are often attributed to pregnancy itself. It is usually diagnosed through routine screening during pregnancy–sometime between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. This is done with a glucose test starting with a one hour then a three hour if unclear.

How Is Gestational Diabetes Treated?

In most cases, gestational diabetes is treated through diet, gestational diabetes diet. The gestational diabetes diet is more like a lifestyle plan than a diet. It does not involve deprivation or weight loss–rather it is a balanced eating plan which encourages intake of healthy foods and eliminating bad ones. The gestational diabetes diet involves eating 3 small, balanced meals per day and at least 1 snack, sometimes 2-4 snacks depending on the plan. Meals should be high in lean protein and dietary fiber and low in certain types of carbohydrates and sugars. It involves carefully reading labels and avoiding foods that are laden with carbs and sugars.

The Gestational Diabetes Diet In A Nutshell

Only a small percentage of women with gestational diabetes will need medication to keep the disease under control. By following the gestational diabetes diet, most women can keep their blood glucose levels within a normal range.

* If eating carbohydrates, choose high fiber, whole grain carbohydrates in favor of less healthy carbs.
* Eat 3-5 servings of vegetables each day and 2-4 servings of fruit. Choose whole fruits in favor of fruit juices and sauces as they are full of sugar.
* Eat 4 servings a day of low fat cheese and dairy. Skim milk, low fat yogurt, and hard cheeses are good options.
* Eat 2-3 servings of lean protein per day. This includes meat, nuts, beans, and eggs. 2-3 ounces per serving is sufficient, and avoid fattier forms of protein.
* Some fats are good. Don’t completely cut fat from your diet, but avoid saturated fats and oils if possible.

If your doctor gives you the okay for exercise, thirty minutes of moderate exercise each day has also been shown to help reduce insulin resistance. Walking is a great way to exercise without putting too much impact on pregnancy-stressed joints and is considered relatively safe even late into pregnancy.

Gestational diabetes is one of the most common pregnancy-related illnesses. Many women are completely unaware they have gestational diabetes until they are screened for it later in pregnancy. In most cases, simply eating a healthy, balanced diet will keep the disease under control. A gestational diabetes diet is not one of deprivation and restriction–rather, it is a healthier way to live and a good way to balance yours and your baby’s nutritional needs.

For more on planning your gestational diabetes treatment and diet plan please sign up for my email list and get my FREE EBOOK on  gestational diabetes. 

And for more on an actual meal plan for gestational diabetes please purchase my book on Amazon below, Mathea Ford RD/LD.. USA   OR a downloadable pdf file here $19.99

 

Diet Plan for Gestational Diabetes

Diet Plan for Gestational Diabetes Management

diet plan for gestational diabetesGestational diabetes occurs in some women during pregnancy as the hormone levels change the body’s insulin requirement. Though it goes away after the child is born, it does increase chances of getting diabetes later in life. The following diet plan for gestational diabetes gives advice on how to eat healthy and effectively manage gestational diabetes.

Following a healthy diet plan for gestational diabetes will not only help to manage your blood glucose levels but also provide adequate nutrition to you and your developing baby. You will also be able to achieve the appropriate weight changes during the pregnancy period.

1. Carbohydrates-diet plan for gestational diabetes

There is a wide variety of foods that you can eat. For carbohydrates, you need at least 12 different choices each day. These should be spread over small meals and snacks throughout the day. Some foods that have carbohydrates include:
-rice, noodles and pasta
-potato, corn and cassava
-legumes such as beans and lentils
-fruits
-milk and yogurt
However, there are some carbohydrates that have little nutritional value such as soft drinks, sugar, cakes and biscuits. These are best avoided as they do not add any value to your body. Sometimes, you may be eating the correct type and quantity of carbohydrates but still experience high levels of blood glucose. In this case, you should not cut back on the carbohydrate intake. Sometimes, your body might need some extra help in order to manage insulin and blood glucose levels.

2. Fat-diet plan for gestational diabetes

The fat you eat should be very limited, more so the saturated fats. You should opt for healthy fats such as olive oil, canola, margarine, avocados and unsalted nuts. Though fat in the diet plan for gestational diabetes does not affect levels of blood glucose directly, they can cause weight gain if taken in large amounts and this makes it harder to control the levels of blood glucose.

3. Protein-diet plan for gestational diabetes

Protein is very important for the maintenance and growth of the body. Foods with protein include fish, eggs, reduced fat cheese, chicken and lean meat. These foods do not affect your levels of blood glucose directly. Though some of the foods listed above are listed as proteins, such as milk, they also have carbohydrates.

4. Iron and Calcium-diet plan for gestational diabetes

The body needs more iron and calcium during pregnancy. You should have 3 servings of food rich in calcium every day. This includes milk, reduced fat cheese and even calcium fortified soy milk. Iron from fish, chicken and red meat is readily absorbed into the body. In case you are vegetarian, you can opt for an iron supplement or even a pregnancy multivitamin.

5. Other Dietary Considerations-diet plan for gestational diabetes

There are some freedoms that come with this diet plan. For instance, nutritious food that will not cause weight gain or an increase in blood glucose levels can be freely eaten. Examples of these foods include lemons, limes and low carbohydrate vegetables. You should endeavor to have at least 5 servings of vegetables each day and also avoid the foods that cause allergies to you.
In conclusion, the diet plan for gestational diabetes involves foods that do not cause increases in levels of blood glucose, do not cause an increase in weight and are also nutritious. Eating healthily is therefore very important for a healthy mother and child.

For a well planned diet plan for gestational diabetes please click here for all the details on what my book offers!

Gestational Diabetes Diet Meal Plan-How to Get Started

Gestational diabetes refers to a case where diabetes is recognized during pregnancy. It is common to about 7% of all pregnancies. The diabetes arises during the second half of the pregnancy and goes way after the baby is born. The diabetes may have further complications if not treated during pregnancy.

Chances of Getting Gestational Diabetes

The chances of getting gestational diabetes are greater if one is overweight, if she had gestational diabetes before, if you have a relative(parent, brother, and sister with type 2 diabetes), if one has ever given birth to a child weighing more than 9 pounds, and she is an American Indian, African American, a Pacific Islander American, and Hispanic/Latina.

How Gestational Diabetes Diet Meal Plan Works

gestational diabetes diet meal planModifying the diet is the first step that a mother that has the disease should emulate towards when treating the condition. This is essential in maintaining the blood sugar level at a normal range while still taking a healthy diet. Gestational diabetes diet meal plan is done by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in the diet. This is because carbohydrates are digested to produce glucose, a core factor in fueling the body and nourishing the developing fetus. However, the glucose levels must be controlled so that they stay at a level that is within target.

The following measures should be taken in order to keep glucose levels in control:

Plan the Meals-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

One can maintain blood sugar levels by eating 3 regular meals in a day and 2 to 4 snacks thorough the day. The meals and the snacks must be balanced and more so in the amount of carbohydrates and calories they contain.

Eat a Good Breakfast-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

One must ensure that she eats a good breakfast because the levels of glucose are usually unstable in the morning. However, one must limit carbohydrate and fruit juice intake and eat proteins instead.

Increase Your Fiber Intake-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

This should include vegetables, beans, peas, legumes and whole grain breads should make up a large portion of your diet.

Limit Your Milk and Sugary Beverage Intake-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

Usually, milk has high lactose (simple sugar) content and must thus be limited to all the mothers that are working to manage gestational diabetes. One should look for additional sources of calcium and additionally avoid fruit juices and soda because they contain a high level of glucose.

Effects of a gestational diabetes meal plan on the child

Glucose crosses the placenta from mother to baby to meet the energy needs of the developing baby. If mother’s blood glucose levels are raised, a greater amount of glucose crosses the placenta to the baby. To manage this extra amount of glucose, the baby produces more insulin. This can cause excessive growth and fat in the baby. If mom’s blood glucose levels continue raised, the baby size may be larger than normal. Following delivery, the baby might experience low blood glucose levels, mostly if the mother’s blood glucose levels were higher before the birth. Gestational diabetes can be monitored and treated with a gestational diabetes diet meal plan and if well controlled, the risks are greatly reduced.

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What Caused My Gestational Diabetes?

What Caused My Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnant women and poses risks to both the developing baby and the mother. This type of diabetes is characterized by high levels of glucose in the blood. This can result into problems during pregnancy, at birth and in future. Many mothers will tend to ask themselves this. What caused my gestational diabetes?

What Caused My Gestational Diabetes?-Causes of gestational diabetes

what caused my gestational diabetesDuring pregnancy, women have some hormonal changes. This hormonal changes cause gestational diabetes. When some hormones made in the placenta (organ that links the developing baby to the mother’s uterus via the umbilical cord) increase, it becomes hard for insulin to manage the new levels of blood glucose. This situation is referred to as insulin resistance. As the pregnancy advances, the placenta increases in size thereby producing more hormones. Consequently, insulin resistance increases insulin resistance. Normally, a mother’s pancreas has the ability to prevail over insulin resistance by producing higher levels of insulin (approximately three times the regular amount). If, on the other hand, the mother’s pancreas fails to produce the necessary amounts of insulin to prevail over the effects of the high levels of insulin, blood glucose will increase leading to gestational diabetes. Luckily, pregnant women can take several precautions to control blood glucose and minimize health risks associated with gestational diabetes. A meal plan is important in preventing and managing gestational diabetes.

Meal plan essentials

Meal plan for pregnant mothers are built around a few essential ideas:

Carbohydrate issues: All types of foods have different combinations of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Carbohydrates affect blood glucose at a faster rate than proteins and fats. Proteins and fats affect blood glucose slowly and over a long period of time. Based on this fact, mothers should regulate intake of carbohydrate-rich foods.
Nutrition issues: It is necessary for pregnant mothers to choose healthy food options. Healthy foods contain nutrients that control gestational diabetes and sustain development and growth of the developing baby. A good meal plan should have healthy food choices.
Timing and portions issues: It is important for pregnant mothers to control their gestational diabetes by managing their eating patterns. A good meal plan outlines when to eat and the amount to eat.

Six important steps to follow:

-Eat less, frequent snacks and meals. Pregnant mothers should eat in intervals of 2 to 3 hours. Foods rich in carbohydrates should be spread evenly in order to maintain stable levels of blood glucose.
-Eat some healthy proteins. Proteins even out or balance blood glucose, make pregnant mothers feel satisfied and energized all day.
-Eat less breakfast. In the morning, blood glucose is often high. Breakfast should be light and have fewer carbohydrates to offset the high levels of blood glucose. Pregnant mothers should take some mid-morning snacks 2 hours after breakfast.
-Eat foods with high amounts of fiber. Pregnant mothers should eat breads, cereals, vegetables and fruits in their evening or afternoon meals for fiber.
-Avoid sweets and sugars. Fruit juices, soft drinks and desserts increase blood glucose rapidly. Pregnant mothers should avoid fruit juices during breakfast and soft drinks or desserts as they increase blood glucose without providing significant nutritional value.
-Avoid fats particularly if you have gained excess weight. Pregnant mothers ought to eat lean protein foods, avoid frying foods and shun convenience foods.

Looking for assistance with a gestational diabetes diet meal plan try this book!

 

What is the Difference Between Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational Diabetes?

What is the Difference Between Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational Diabetes?

Diabetes is a very common condition among the older population. Almost all people are familiar with this condition and they know that in order to manage this disease, one has to cut down on his/her sugar consumption. However, did you know that there are actually three types of diabetes? Although all three of them involve high blood sugar in the body, they have distinct differences that call for classification.

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Those who congenitally have diabetes are classified under type 1 diabetes. This is often dubbed as juvenile diabetes because it is most common among children. However, it can still be diagnosed among adults. This type of diabetes is an autoimmune condition that permanently destroys the beta cells in the pancreas, which are responsible for producing insulin. Hence, the body can no longer produce any insulin.

Symptoms for type 1 diabetes is the same as that of type 2—there is thirst, fatigue, and frequent urination. However, people with type 1 diabetes mellitus are usually thin as they tend to lose weight since glucose is not properly absorbed by the body.

Treatment for type 1 diabetes involves insulin therapy. People should also make permanent lifestyle changes, such as having a healthy diet and becoming physically active. If not controlled or treated, this condition can lead to several complications such as heart disease, kidney disease, retinopathy, and stroke.

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The most common and well-known type of diabetes is type 2 diabetes mellitus. It affects millions of people all over the world. Unlike type 1 diabetes, this type of diabetes is caused by lifestyle factors, such as being obese, having high blood pressure, and having high cholesterol. The beta cells of the pancreas still produce insulin, but this insulin is no longer effectively used by the body, thus resulting to insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. It is only during the advanced stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus that the beta cells can become damaged, hence resulting to insulin deficiency.

Treatment starts with diet modification and physical activity in order to lose weight. Oral hypoglycemic agents will be prescribed, and, depending on the severity of the illness, you may be asked to regularly monitor your blood sugar levels at home. If the oral medications are no longer working, you might also need to subject yourself to insulin therapy.

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes, as its name suggests, happens only to pregnant women and is diagnosed during the second or third trimester. This is caused by the hormonal changes happening in your body. The hormones that are made by the placenta resist insulin, thus letting glucose stay in your bloodstream. This then causes high blood sugar. Moreover, your insulin needs as a pregnant woman increases by two or three times than the normal insulin needs because of the growing fetus inside your womb. All these factors pile up, giving you a condition known as gestational diabetes.

Women with gestational diabetes should control their blood glucose levels, as high blood sugar can have detrimental effects on both the mother and the baby. It is important to monitor your blood glucose levels regularly and to practice eating healthy and engaging in physical activities.

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Is Gestational Diabetes Preventable?

Is Gestational Diabetes Preventable?

Gestational diabetes can happen to anyone who is pregnant. Although there are factors that increase the risk of gestational diabetes in a pregnant woman, there are some people who still get afflicted with this condition even though they have no prior risk to it. Hence, there is really no guarantee that you can prevent gestational diabetes, but having healthy lifestyle habits before you get pregnant can still make a difference. Even if you have gestational diabetes now, these healthy habits can help you prevent developing gestational diabetes in your future pregnancies. They can also help you avoid type 2 diabetes later in life.

If you want to prevent gestational diabetes, follow these simple tips:

  • Have a healthy diet. Since one of the risk factors of gestational diabetes is being overweight, the food that you eat counts a lot in preventing gestational diabetes. Opt for healthy choices, such as foods that are low in fat and sugar but high in fiber. Fatty and sweet foods can make you gain weight, and if you do not control what you eat, you are well on your way to becoming overweight, or worse, obese. On the other hand, high fiber foods promote better digestion and elimination, thus helping you lose weight. Eat a lot of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, since they are packed with vitamins and minerals and low in fat. Eating the same kinds of food can be boring, but the key is to strive for variety so that you can still eat nutritious food without compromising your health.
  • Exercise regularly. Diet always goes hand in hand with exercise. Although you can lose weight by simply eating smaller portions and healthier foods, your body will only be toned through exercise. Moreover, exercise is good for heart health. This is needed to prevent gestational diabetes complications such as hypertension and heart attack. In exercising, you can start with 30 minutes of moderate activity at least three times a week. Since you are pregnant, you don’t have to do high impact exercises. Simple walking, jogging, biking, and swimming already count as exercises. You can also chop your 30-minute exercise sessions into shorter periods throughout the day if you find the former tiring.
  • Lose weight before pregnancy. If you have plans of getting pregnant, make sure that your body is in tip top shape before you carry out your plan. That means you should make sure that you are not overweight so that you do not run the risk of developing gestational diabetes. Losing weight will not only benefit you in terms of your gestational diabetes, but also in terms of heart, muscle, and bone health. This can also improve your self-esteem dramatically. Doctors usually do no recommend losing weight while you are pregnant unless there is a necessity to do it, so you have no other time to lose weight but right now while you are still planning for your pregnancy.

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What Are The Healthiest Ways In Cooking For Gestational Diabetes – Grill, Fry, Microwave, Stovetop?

Cooking for Gestational Diabetes

In gestational diabetes, healthy eating does not only mean eating the right type of food. It also means cooking those foods in the right way. There are several cooking methods that cut great amounts of calories from foods that normally contain lots of fats. Good thing that there are several ways to cook healthy, and you are not limited to just one option. Grilling, stir frying, microwaving, and some stove top cooking methods can help you achieve your goal of eating healthy. Here are the reasons why these cooking methods are perfect for women with gestational diabetes:

Grilling –Cooking for gestational diabetes

cooking for gestational diabetesA lot of grilled foods are good for women with gestational diabetes basically because they are low in fat and high in nutrients. Moreover, grilling does not strip your food of flavor; in fact, this cooking method enhances flavor, making it not just a healthy way of cooking but also a delicious way of bringing out the flavor in your foods. You can marinate your food using olive oil and citrus juices to tenderize the meat and vegetables that you are grilling.

Just remember that if you are grilling meat, you have to remove the excess fats just like other cooking methods. Burnt fats produce heterocyclic amines (HCA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are said to be cancer-causing substances. You also need to remember not to overcook foods, since the charred bits can increase the production of HCA and PAH. In addition, you can add herbs like mint, basil, rosemary, oregano, thyme, and sage to reduce HCA formation and to add flavor to your grilled foods.

Stir-Frying-Cooking for gestational diabetes

Stir frying is also a healthy way of cooking for gestational diabetes because it allows you to subject your food to very high heat for a short time. Hence, in order to cook them thoroughly, your food must be cut into smaller pieces and you must continuously stir the food to keep them from being burnt. For woman with gestational diabetes, you can stir fry different vegetables such as broccoli, bell peppers, mushrooms, and eggplants. Since you need to cut them into small pieces when you stir fry them, it will help also help you to control what you eat. You can also use olive oil to make your food a lot healthier.

Microwaving-Cooking for gestational diabetes

Microwaving is just like steaming, since you are just subjecting the food to heat without using any oils or fats. You can microwave goods like vegetables, fish, and chicken in order to retain their nutrients. You can also cover the food while microwaving so as to retain the steam inside. Just make sure that you use microwave-safe cooking vessels, such as glass and baking dishes. Metal, Styrofoam, and some plastic containers are not safe to be used in the microwave.

Stove Top-Cooking for gestational diabetes

Different stove top methods are considered to be healthy ways of cooking for gestational diabetes. These methods include steaming, simmering, and boiling. Steaming leaves your vegetables tasting crunchy but still nutritious because it uses less amount of water compared to boiling and simmering. Boiling and simmering are common ways of cooking vegetables by submerging them in boiling water, with the latter only using less heat than the former. All of these stove top cooking methods can be used to cook nutritious foods for cooking for gestational diabetes.

For more information on the dietary considerations for women with gestational diabetes, please sign up for our newsletter. Looking for a complete gestational diabetes meal plan then look no further.  My book of complete meal plan and recipes is located here available on  Amazon in the US and the UK!

Eating Right is Eating the Way You Want to Eat

The title of this article may seem conflicting to you. After all, how can you eat what you want if you have gestational diabetes? Although at first the dietary modifications that you need to employ may limit your food intake drastically, remember that this is not the goal of gestational diabetes treatment. You only need to lessen your carbohydrate intake so as not to increase your blood glucose levels. That means that you can still eat other foods as long as they do not spike up your sugar levels. Hence, you still have a pretty vast variety of foods that you can choose from.

Eating right means knowing what is good for you and choosing from the foods that you want to eat from those choices. To aid you in making healthy diabetic food choices, here are some tips for you to remember:

  • Choose complex high-fiber carbohydrates. If you love eating carbohydrates, you can still indulge in them even if you have gestational diabetes. It all boils down to what kind of carbohydrates you can eat. Generally speaking, you should only avoid those that contain refined carbohydrates, such as pasta, rice, and white bread. You also have to avoid those that contain simple sugars, like candy and soda. What you can eat are those known to be slow-release carbohydrates, which are so-called because they are digested slowly, thus letting your body control the blood glucose levels more easily. These are even advantageous because they make you feel full for a longer period of time. Choose alternatives to your favorite refined carbohydrates, such as brown rice instead of white rice, sweet potatoes instead of mashed and fried ones, and whole-wheat pastas and breads instead of the regular ones.
  • Watch out for your sweets. Although sweets contain simple sugars, it does not mean that you can never eat them during the duration of your gestational diabetes condition. Moderation is the key in eating these favorite desserts. At first, your sweet tooth habit may be hard to overcome, but it will get easier overtime once you keep on practicing healthy eating. Learn to compromise, like letting go of complex carbohydrate foods if you want to have some dessert. You should also learn to eat healthy fats, such as those found in yogurt and peanut butter. Also, sweets should be eaten as part of the meal to avoid spikes in blood sugar levels.
  • Eat healthy fats, not unhealthy ones. There are two kinds of fats – the unhealthy fats (saturated and trans fats) that can be found in whole milk dairy products, red meat, and eggs; and the healthy fats (unsaturated fats) coming from fish and plant sources. Of course, common sense dictates that you should eat more healthy fats, since these contain omega-3 fatty acids that are good for both your brain and heart. Those with gestational diabetes are also at risk for developing heart and brain complications.

Remember that eating smart is the key to eating right for women with gestational diabetes. If you want to learn more tips in eating the right foods for gestational diabetes, please sign up for our newsletter or Buy my book on Amazon, it is a complete gestational diabetes meal plan.

Green Things Are Healthy for You On St. Patrick’s Day-Gestational Diabetes

If there is any time of the year that pushes you to go green, that would be St. Patrick’s Day. There is no other time of the year best fit for you to enjoy eating healthy green foods other than St. Patrick’s Day. This especially goes out to all those with gestational diabetes, since eating green means also eating healthy. It is more than just the color of the foods that you eat; it also means the nutritional content of the food that makes it “green”. Here are seven great green dishes and delicacies for you to try during St. Patrick’s Day:

  • Lime yogurt pie – In order to do this, you need to use some fat-free cream cheese and low-fat or light yogurt. The fresh lime juice content will also add a tangy flavor to this sweet treat. This is the perfect dessert for those who want to indulge in something sweet yet healthy this St. Patrick’s Day.
  • Protein shamrock shake – Sweet treats don’t have to be a guilty pleasure for you as this shake only contains 8 grams of carbohydrates and 30 grams of protein. Just make sure that you use low-fat cottage cheese and protein powder. Add mint flavoring to your shake for a cool effect in your mouth.
  • Vegetable burger – The difference between the veggie burger and the regular burger is that the latter contains lots of fats, while the former contains hardly any fats. For women with gestational diabetes, a mixture of chick peas, spinach, cucumber slices, lettuce leaves, avocado halves, and tomato slices make up a good vegetable burger.
  • Garlicky kale salad – Only containing 7 grams of carbohydrates, a bowl of kale can be converted into a healthy and delicious salad just by adding apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, and minced garlic. Aside from being low in carbohydrates, it is also low in calories and high in fiber and antioxidants, making it a pretty great meal for women with gestational diabetes.
  • Zucchini cakes – With only 63 calories, there is no doubt that zucchini cakes are healthy treats for those with gestational diabetes. Although it is a cake, it only contains 1.1 grams of sugar, so this can be a nutritious dessert which you can enjoy in several servings.
  • Green detox soup – This green-colored soup is made from a mixture of different vegetables and fruits such as avocado, broccoli, onions, and lemon juice. The ingredients are also known to be good antioxidants, and that means that this food is packed with a lot of nutritional benefits.
  • Green chili chicken – You can get a lot of protein from this delicious soup, since it contains 54.6 grams of protein. Aside from chicken, the soup contains a variety of vegetables such as red pepper, garlic, cumin, and cilantro, which makes it green and healthy. The additional jalapeno and green chiles give a spicy kick to this tasty dish.

Although the aforementioned dishes are great for St. Patrick’s Day, remember that this is not the only day for you to eat healthy. You can learn about more nutritional dishes for gestational diabetes if you sign up for our newsletter.  If you are in need of a diet meal plan for gestational diabetes meal plan.  This is a complete meal plan and recipes, it written by Mathea Ford RD/LD, find it on Amazon below.

Healthy Eating Out at Restaurants For Gestational Diabetes Moms

Wondering What You Should Do When Eating Out?

English: McDonald's Restaurant, Bermuda Park A...

Having gestational diabetes is not the end of the world for a pregnant woman. In fact, you can still enjoy much of the foods that you normally eat, but always in moderation. That being said, eating out at restaurants is not a total no-no for you, as it still remains one of your options. In fact, the choices that you have for eating out can still be the same choices that you have at home. As with eating at home, remember that you also need to have a balanced diet once you decide to dine out. Here are some guidelines that you need to remember to still keep healthy while eating out at restaurants:

  • Select the “right” restaurant. Before you go to whatever restaurant to eat out, you can research their menu beforehand so that you know what kinds of food to expect. Choose restaurant that have healthy food options, such as those with low fat and low sugar content. In fact, some restaurant websites contain nutritional and caloric information about their foods, so you can already plan what to eat even before you step into the restaurant. If such information is not available, you can instead opt for a restaurant where you can ask the chef to prepare low fat food for you.
  • Be mindful of the servings. There are some restaurants that offer large meal portions, so you need to control how much you eat by opting for smaller servings. You can also share with your partner if there are jumbo servings. Avoid supersizing your meals since this can lead to an exacerbation of gestational diabetes symptoms.
  • Avoid the freebies. Oftentimes, restaurants serve free bread, crackers, or chips while you are waiting for your meal. You can already skip these appetizers, especially since they are usually full of calories that will further increase your blood sugar levels. If you really want to have an appetizer, a safe choice would be a vegetable salad.
  • Use gravy and dressings sparingly. Both salad dressings and meat gravy are very high in fats, so you should not pour these over your meals like there’s no tomorrow. Instead, ask the waiter to serve it on the side so that you can control how much gravy or dressing you put into your food. If there is any low-fat dressing, that would be a good choice.
  • Substitute unhealthy foods with healthy ones. You can request from the chef or the waiter that instead of giving you fries as sides, they can just serve you garden salad instead. You can also substitute hash browns with fresh fruits.
  • Take note of what you drink. Your blood sugar levels might rise with sodas, fruit juices, shakes, tea, and coffee. While it is best to just drink plenty of water, you can still indulge in other drinks, provided that you only consume a little amount of those drinks.
  • Avoid fried foods. Remember that an average fast food restaurant serves food that have a lot of calories, fats, and salt, since the way that they cooked their food was almost always deep fried. Instead of eating fried foods, opt for baked or grilled foods instead.

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