1800 Calorie Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational diabetes is a disease that poses significant challenges to both the mother and the developing baby. This condition can be managed with lifestyle and diet modifications. One of the most reliable and recommended diet modification plans is the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet. This diet helps to maintain low glucose levels in the mother’s body, accelerates metabolism and may help the mother lose weight. Pregnant mothers who have gestational diabetes should stick to this health diet to minimize any serious diabetes related conditions.

About the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet plan

1800 calorie gestational diabetes dietThis diet plan gives a specific amount of calories that a mother should take each day to control gestational diabetes. As the name suggests, a mother should take 1800 calories each day. The 1800 calories are comprised of 50% carbohydrates (900 calories), 30% fats (540 calories) and 20% proteins (360 calories). This meal plan aims at reducing glucose or carbohydrates consumed by a pregnant mother suffering from the condition. Additionally, it encourages low fat intake and high fiber intake.

Carbohydrates-1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

The 1800 diet plan requires a pregnant mother to have three or four servings of meals rich in carbohydrates. One or two servings should be snacks taken between meals. A good example of one serving of carbohydrates is a slice of bread, a cup of soup, 1/3 cup of pasta or rice, a small fruit, a half cup of canned fruits, a cup of leafy vegetables, a half cup of starchy vegetables and a cup of milk.

Fats-1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

For this type of diet, fats should contribute less than sixty grams or 540 calories daily. A mother should focus on beneficial fats like olive oil, canola oil, peanut or soybean oils. Fried foods should be avoided at all costs because they contain high amounts of trans fats. Butter and fatty meats should also be avoided because they are high in saturated fats. However, a mother should not cut fats all in all. The brain requires omega-3 fatty foods for development. In general, two tablespoons of vegetable oil are sufficient. The rest of the fat calories can be obtained from lean meat, eggs, fish and dairies.

Proteins-1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

2 or 3 servings of protein daily are sufficient to manage gestational diabetes. A mother should make sure that one serving of protein has fish, poultry or meat. Intake of proteins should be spread out throughout the day, just like carbohydrates, because proteins help in managing post-meal blood glucose. One serving of protein can either be one egg or 2 tablespoons of peanut butter or a half cup of beans.
The 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet requires a mother to burn up energy. As such, it is vital for a mother to jog, walk, cycle, exercise bicycling or dance to burn up energy. Maintaining an 1800 calorie diet and exercising requires discipline. When the two are observed, it becomes easy to manage gestational diabetes and to shed unnecessary weight. The advantage of the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet is that a mother gets to enjoy all types of good foods but in limited quantities. The diet plan keeps the body healthy and the taste buds happy.

I have a plan that conforms closely to the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet it is my plan for 2000 calories.  Many OB’s subscribe 2000 or 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet but they are close in calories as long as they are managed.

For meal planning for gestational diabetes click here 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

 

Gestational Diabetes Diet

gestational diabetes diet

gestational diabetes diet

FREE EBOOK

 

First things first, I want you to have 3 of my dinner recipes for gestational diabetes FREE and I created an Ebook on managing gestational diabetes that I want you to have FREE as well.  Go to the green box to the right and I will email it to you.

Now, many things come into play when you find out you have gestational diabetes, I know, I had it twice.  Outcomes today are just fine.  But I want you to understand why I created the Ebook I am giving out for free and why I created “Gestational Diabetes Diet Meal Plan and Recipes”  you see over here on the left.  I really want to give back to all of you who are going through emotional times with this condition.  I found that the support from my OB was horrible so I wanted to create this meal planning book to be a source so no woman is lost and on an island with this condition.

Get the FREE stuff and then see what you think about grabbing the meal plan and recipe book!

This condition can be a challenge and among all of these changes, the health of the baby growing within you is the biggest concern, and the health of the baby can sometimes become compromised when gestational diabetes is factored into the equation. In most cases, gestational diabetes can be treated through a healthy diet, gestational diabetes diet, though in some cases medication is required to keep insulin levels under control. Regardless, gestational diabetes is something that could have a future impact on the health of you and your child later in life if it is not treated properly.

What Causes Gestational Diabetes?

During pregnancy, sometimes the body becomes more resistant to insulin. This leaves excess levels of glucose floating around in the bloodstream. While most women never experience any symptoms of gestational diabetes, there are some risks to the baby if it is left unchecked. Not only can the baby gain too much weight–particularly in the upper body, but gestational diabetes can also lead to weight problems later in life for the child. Untreated gestational diabetes also can cause a baby to be born with extremely low blood sugar levels, as their pancreas will be producing too much insulin at birth. This can lead to convulsions, coma, and even death.

What Are The Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes?

Most times, gestational diabetes is asymptomatic in women. In some cases, however, symptoms include increased thirst, increased urination, blurred vision, increased fatigue, weight gain, and nausea or vomiting. They are often mild and go unnoticed during pregnancy, however, as they are often attributed to pregnancy itself. It is usually diagnosed through routine screening during pregnancy–sometime between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. This is done with a glucose test starting with a one hour then a three hour if unclear.

How Is Gestational Diabetes Treated?

In most cases, gestational diabetes is treated through diet, gestational diabetes diet. The gestational diabetes diet is more like a lifestyle plan than a diet. It does not involve deprivation or weight loss–rather it is a balanced eating plan which encourages intake of healthy foods and eliminating bad ones. The gestational diabetes diet involves eating 3 small, balanced meals per day and at least 1 snack, sometimes 2-4 snacks depending on the plan. Meals should be high in lean protein and dietary fiber and low in certain types of carbohydrates and sugars. It involves carefully reading labels and avoiding foods that are laden with carbs and sugars.

The Gestational Diabetes Diet In A Nutshell

Only a small percentage of women with gestational diabetes will need medication to keep the disease under control. By following the gestational diabetes diet, most women can keep their blood glucose levels within a normal range.

* If eating carbohydrates, choose high fiber, whole grain carbohydrates in favor of less healthy carbs.
* Eat 3-5 servings of vegetables each day and 2-4 servings of fruit. Choose whole fruits in favor of fruit juices and sauces as they are full of sugar.
* Eat 4 servings a day of low fat cheese and dairy. Skim milk, low fat yogurt, and hard cheeses are good options.
* Eat 2-3 servings of lean protein per day. This includes meat, nuts, beans, and eggs. 2-3 ounces per serving is sufficient, and avoid fattier forms of protein.
* Some fats are good. Don’t completely cut fat from your diet, but avoid saturated fats and oils if possible.

If your doctor gives you the okay for exercise, thirty minutes of moderate exercise each day has also been shown to help reduce insulin resistance. Walking is a great way to exercise without putting too much impact on pregnancy-stressed joints and is considered relatively safe even late into pregnancy.

Gestational diabetes is one of the most common pregnancy-related illnesses. Many women are completely unaware they have gestational diabetes until they are screened for it later in pregnancy. In most cases, simply eating a healthy, balanced diet will keep the disease under control. A gestational diabetes diet is not one of deprivation and restriction–rather, it is a healthier way to live and a good way to balance yours and your baby’s nutritional needs.

For more on planning your gestational diabetes treatment and diet plan please sign up for my email list and get my FREE EBOOK on  gestational diabetes. 

And for more on an actual meal plan for gestational diabetes please purchase my book on Amazon below, Mathea Ford RD/LD.. USA   OR a downloadable pdf file here $19.99

 

Gestational Diabetes Diet Meal Plan-How to Get Started

Gestational diabetes refers to a case where diabetes is recognized during pregnancy. It is common to about 7% of all pregnancies. The diabetes arises during the second half of the pregnancy and goes way after the baby is born. The diabetes may have further complications if not treated during pregnancy.

Chances of Getting Gestational Diabetes

The chances of getting gestational diabetes are greater if one is overweight, if she had gestational diabetes before, if you have a relative(parent, brother, and sister with type 2 diabetes), if one has ever given birth to a child weighing more than 9 pounds, and she is an American Indian, African American, a Pacific Islander American, and Hispanic/Latina.

How Gestational Diabetes Diet Meal Plan Works

gestational diabetes diet meal planModifying the diet is the first step that a mother that has the disease should emulate towards when treating the condition. This is essential in maintaining the blood sugar level at a normal range while still taking a healthy diet. Gestational diabetes diet meal plan is done by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in the diet. This is because carbohydrates are digested to produce glucose, a core factor in fueling the body and nourishing the developing fetus. However, the glucose levels must be controlled so that they stay at a level that is within target.

The following measures should be taken in order to keep glucose levels in control:

Plan the Meals-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

One can maintain blood sugar levels by eating 3 regular meals in a day and 2 to 4 snacks thorough the day. The meals and the snacks must be balanced and more so in the amount of carbohydrates and calories they contain.

Eat a Good Breakfast-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

One must ensure that she eats a good breakfast because the levels of glucose are usually unstable in the morning. However, one must limit carbohydrate and fruit juice intake and eat proteins instead.

Increase Your Fiber Intake-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

This should include vegetables, beans, peas, legumes and whole grain breads should make up a large portion of your diet.

Limit Your Milk and Sugary Beverage Intake-gestational diabetes diet meal plan

Usually, milk has high lactose (simple sugar) content and must thus be limited to all the mothers that are working to manage gestational diabetes. One should look for additional sources of calcium and additionally avoid fruit juices and soda because they contain a high level of glucose.

Effects of a gestational diabetes meal plan on the child

Glucose crosses the placenta from mother to baby to meet the energy needs of the developing baby. If mother’s blood glucose levels are raised, a greater amount of glucose crosses the placenta to the baby. To manage this extra amount of glucose, the baby produces more insulin. This can cause excessive growth and fat in the baby. If mom’s blood glucose levels continue raised, the baby size may be larger than normal. Following delivery, the baby might experience low blood glucose levels, mostly if the mother’s blood glucose levels were higher before the birth. Gestational diabetes can be monitored and treated with a gestational diabetes diet meal plan and if well controlled, the risks are greatly reduced.

To learn more about gestational diabetes please sign up for my newsletter and get my FREE EBOOK

And for a my gestational diabetes diet meal planning book,  see the Amazon link below!  You will not be sorry you bought this book and your husband will be cooking for you in no time!  OR A PDF VERSION DOWNLOADABLE HERE

Gestational Diabetes Breakfast Diet Meal Plan

slice of rye breadGestational Diabetes Breakfast

Gestational diabetes is a very common condition that occurs among pregnant women. If not controlled effectively, gestational diabetes may cause problems during pregnancy and may also affect the child and mother later in life.  A gestational diabetes breakfast to start your day is very important. Just like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes mainly affects the use of glucose in the body. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that it is properly managed in order to avoid passing the excess blood glucose to the unborn child. In case the excess glucose is passed on to the child, it may cause a condition known as fat baby or macrosomia. These babies are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, obesity, and breathing problems later in life. On the other hand, the baby is more likely to have hypoglycemia and/or damage to the shoulders during delivery.

Importance of breakfast to women with gestational diabetes

4.1.1A gestational diabetes breakfast menu needs to be very flexible in order to ensure that it can be easily adjusted to fit the current situation. Since no food is taken during sleep, it is normal for the blood sugar level to vary from the recommended levels (In most cases, it I lower than recommended). In such cases, it is critical to ensure a corresponding adjustment in the sugar level and carbohydrate of the breakfast meal in order to maintain the amount of glucose in the blood at a healthy level. Therefore, the carbohydrate-controlled plan needs to be individualized based on every woman’s preferences and needs. This is mainly because the type, amount and distribution of food during breakfast will affect blood glucose control throughout the day. However, due to
increased hormonal activity, carbohydrates are not tolerated well during breakfast. Though some carbohydrates are necessary during every meal, the bulk of breakfast needs to be comprised of protein in order to achieve better glucose control.

Breakfast foods for gestational diabetes

When coming up with a breakfast plan for a person with gestational diabetes, every dietitian aims at maintaining stable glucose levels throughout the day in order to provide enough energy and ensure provision of adequate nutrients for the mother and unborn baby.To avoid a sudden rush of energy, it is vital to balance carbohydrates with dairy and proteins.

Possible breakfast combinations include:

2 slices of wholegrain waffle, peanut butter spread and ½ cup of non-fat skimmed milk.
A slice of whole wheat bread, a hardboiled egg and ½ cup of non-fat skimmed milk.
Egg breakfast taco and turkey sausage
Egg sandwich and Canadian bacon on whole-wheat bread

It is very important to ensure that only sugarless dairy products are consumed. On the other hand, the milk should be skimmed with a low fat concentration. Avoid all beverages that increase the risk of diabetes such as alcohol, tea and wine and minimize the intake of fast foods.

Breakfast tips for gestational diabetes

Don’t drink fruit juice or eat fruits.
Avoid cereal.
Ensure that your breakfast has protein.
Eat a small (in terms of quantity) breakfast meal
Consume whole-grain bread products.

Hormones that boost blood sugar level are normally released in the morning making it quite hard to control blood glucose. Therefore, you need to follow these breakfast tips in order to control gestational diabetes more effectively.

What Caused My Gestational Diabetes?

What Caused My Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnant women and poses risks to both the developing baby and the mother. This type of diabetes is characterized by high levels of glucose in the blood. This can result into problems during pregnancy, at birth and in future. Many mothers will tend to ask themselves this. What caused my gestational diabetes?

What Caused My Gestational Diabetes?-Causes of gestational diabetes

what caused my gestational diabetesDuring pregnancy, women have some hormonal changes. This hormonal changes cause gestational diabetes. When some hormones made in the placenta (organ that links the developing baby to the mother’s uterus via the umbilical cord) increase, it becomes hard for insulin to manage the new levels of blood glucose. This situation is referred to as insulin resistance. As the pregnancy advances, the placenta increases in size thereby producing more hormones. Consequently, insulin resistance increases insulin resistance. Normally, a mother’s pancreas has the ability to prevail over insulin resistance by producing higher levels of insulin (approximately three times the regular amount). If, on the other hand, the mother’s pancreas fails to produce the necessary amounts of insulin to prevail over the effects of the high levels of insulin, blood glucose will increase leading to gestational diabetes. Luckily, pregnant women can take several precautions to control blood glucose and minimize health risks associated with gestational diabetes. A meal plan is important in preventing and managing gestational diabetes.

Meal plan essentials

Meal plan for pregnant mothers are built around a few essential ideas:

Carbohydrate issues: All types of foods have different combinations of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Carbohydrates affect blood glucose at a faster rate than proteins and fats. Proteins and fats affect blood glucose slowly and over a long period of time. Based on this fact, mothers should regulate intake of carbohydrate-rich foods.
Nutrition issues: It is necessary for pregnant mothers to choose healthy food options. Healthy foods contain nutrients that control gestational diabetes and sustain development and growth of the developing baby. A good meal plan should have healthy food choices.
Timing and portions issues: It is important for pregnant mothers to control their gestational diabetes by managing their eating patterns. A good meal plan outlines when to eat and the amount to eat.

Six important steps to follow:

-Eat less, frequent snacks and meals. Pregnant mothers should eat in intervals of 2 to 3 hours. Foods rich in carbohydrates should be spread evenly in order to maintain stable levels of blood glucose.
-Eat some healthy proteins. Proteins even out or balance blood glucose, make pregnant mothers feel satisfied and energized all day.
-Eat less breakfast. In the morning, blood glucose is often high. Breakfast should be light and have fewer carbohydrates to offset the high levels of blood glucose. Pregnant mothers should take some mid-morning snacks 2 hours after breakfast.
-Eat foods with high amounts of fiber. Pregnant mothers should eat breads, cereals, vegetables and fruits in their evening or afternoon meals for fiber.
-Avoid sweets and sugars. Fruit juices, soft drinks and desserts increase blood glucose rapidly. Pregnant mothers should avoid fruit juices during breakfast and soft drinks or desserts as they increase blood glucose without providing significant nutritional value.
-Avoid fats particularly if you have gained excess weight. Pregnant mothers ought to eat lean protein foods, avoid frying foods and shun convenience foods.

Looking for assistance with a gestational diabetes diet meal plan try this book!

 

Is Gestational Diabetes Preventable?

Is Gestational Diabetes Preventable?

Gestational diabetes can happen to anyone who is pregnant. Although there are factors that increase the risk of gestational diabetes in a pregnant woman, there are some people who still get afflicted with this condition even though they have no prior risk to it. Hence, there is really no guarantee that you can prevent gestational diabetes, but having healthy lifestyle habits before you get pregnant can still make a difference. Even if you have gestational diabetes now, these healthy habits can help you prevent developing gestational diabetes in your future pregnancies. They can also help you avoid type 2 diabetes later in life.

If you want to prevent gestational diabetes, follow these simple tips:

  • Have a healthy diet. Since one of the risk factors of gestational diabetes is being overweight, the food that you eat counts a lot in preventing gestational diabetes. Opt for healthy choices, such as foods that are low in fat and sugar but high in fiber. Fatty and sweet foods can make you gain weight, and if you do not control what you eat, you are well on your way to becoming overweight, or worse, obese. On the other hand, high fiber foods promote better digestion and elimination, thus helping you lose weight. Eat a lot of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, since they are packed with vitamins and minerals and low in fat. Eating the same kinds of food can be boring, but the key is to strive for variety so that you can still eat nutritious food without compromising your health.
  • Exercise regularly. Diet always goes hand in hand with exercise. Although you can lose weight by simply eating smaller portions and healthier foods, your body will only be toned through exercise. Moreover, exercise is good for heart health. This is needed to prevent gestational diabetes complications such as hypertension and heart attack. In exercising, you can start with 30 minutes of moderate activity at least three times a week. Since you are pregnant, you don’t have to do high impact exercises. Simple walking, jogging, biking, and swimming already count as exercises. You can also chop your 30-minute exercise sessions into shorter periods throughout the day if you find the former tiring.
  • Lose weight before pregnancy. If you have plans of getting pregnant, make sure that your body is in tip top shape before you carry out your plan. That means you should make sure that you are not overweight so that you do not run the risk of developing gestational diabetes. Losing weight will not only benefit you in terms of your gestational diabetes, but also in terms of heart, muscle, and bone health. This can also improve your self-esteem dramatically. Doctors usually do no recommend losing weight while you are pregnant unless there is a necessity to do it, so you have no other time to lose weight but right now while you are still planning for your pregnancy.

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How Soon After I Have The Baby Should I Be Checked For Diabetes?

One of the worries that most women with gestational diabetes have in their minds is their condition after pregnancy and giving birth. Will they continue to have diabetes, or will their lifestyle be back to the way it was before they got pregnant? The answer is pretty simple: Your gestational diabetes will disappear once you are no longer pregnant. Otherwise, that would already be a case of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Now, the next question that would probably be plaguing your mind is this: How soon do I know this? In order for you to know the state of your blood glucose levels, you need to subject yourself to a postnatal check to determine if everything is okay with you and your baby.

The Postnatal Check

In reality, your pregnancy hormones will drop a few days after giving birth. Remember that these hormones are the ones responsible for the delay of glucose transportation from your bloodstream to your cells, hence causing gestational diabetes. However, you will only know this once you get a postnatal check.

Also known as the six-week check, your postnatal check will be done six to eight weeks after giving birth, or roughly two months after your delivery. You have to make an appointment with your doctor to have you and your baby checked.

If you had gestational diabetes during pregnancy, you may be asked to subject yourself to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during your postnatal check. Statistics show that one out of 50 women still have diabetes even after pregnancy, and this might mean that they had diabetes mellitus all along and they just had not realized this. Hence, this test will determine if your blood sugar levels have already returned to normal.

Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

This is the same test that you are being subjected to during the diagnosis stage of gestational diabetes. Before the test, you need to fast overnight. Check with your health care provider regarding the intake of your maintenance medications.

Once you arrive at the clinic, a blood sample will be taken from you. This sample will be the basis for the baseline test, since this will measure the blood glucose levels during fasting. Afterwards, you will be asked to drink a sweet and sugary mixture, which is equivalent to 75 grams of glucose. You have to drink the whole mixture, after which another blood sample will be collected two hours after drinking the mixture. This next blood sample will be compared to the baseline sample to see how high your sugar levels rose and whether or not it is within the normal range. Take note that you should not eat or drink anything within the two-hour waiting time. You can only eat after the second blood sample has been taken. The result will usually be ready 48 hours after the test.

If you get a positive result from the test, it is likely that you have already developed type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, a negative result means your gestational diabetes had gone away and you can resume your normal routine.

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Green Things Are Healthy for You On St. Patrick’s Day-Gestational Diabetes

If there is any time of the year that pushes you to go green, that would be St. Patrick’s Day. There is no other time of the year best fit for you to enjoy eating healthy green foods other than St. Patrick’s Day. This especially goes out to all those with gestational diabetes, since eating green means also eating healthy. It is more than just the color of the foods that you eat; it also means the nutritional content of the food that makes it “green”. Here are seven great green dishes and delicacies for you to try during St. Patrick’s Day:

  • Lime yogurt pie – In order to do this, you need to use some fat-free cream cheese and low-fat or light yogurt. The fresh lime juice content will also add a tangy flavor to this sweet treat. This is the perfect dessert for those who want to indulge in something sweet yet healthy this St. Patrick’s Day.
  • Protein shamrock shake – Sweet treats don’t have to be a guilty pleasure for you as this shake only contains 8 grams of carbohydrates and 30 grams of protein. Just make sure that you use low-fat cottage cheese and protein powder. Add mint flavoring to your shake for a cool effect in your mouth.
  • Vegetable burger – The difference between the veggie burger and the regular burger is that the latter contains lots of fats, while the former contains hardly any fats. For women with gestational diabetes, a mixture of chick peas, spinach, cucumber slices, lettuce leaves, avocado halves, and tomato slices make up a good vegetable burger.
  • Garlicky kale salad – Only containing 7 grams of carbohydrates, a bowl of kale can be converted into a healthy and delicious salad just by adding apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, and minced garlic. Aside from being low in carbohydrates, it is also low in calories and high in fiber and antioxidants, making it a pretty great meal for women with gestational diabetes.
  • Zucchini cakes – With only 63 calories, there is no doubt that zucchini cakes are healthy treats for those with gestational diabetes. Although it is a cake, it only contains 1.1 grams of sugar, so this can be a nutritious dessert which you can enjoy in several servings.
  • Green detox soup – This green-colored soup is made from a mixture of different vegetables and fruits such as avocado, broccoli, onions, and lemon juice. The ingredients are also known to be good antioxidants, and that means that this food is packed with a lot of nutritional benefits.
  • Green chili chicken – You can get a lot of protein from this delicious soup, since it contains 54.6 grams of protein. Aside from chicken, the soup contains a variety of vegetables such as red pepper, garlic, cumin, and cilantro, which makes it green and healthy. The additional jalapeno and green chiles give a spicy kick to this tasty dish.

Although the aforementioned dishes are great for St. Patrick’s Day, remember that this is not the only day for you to eat healthy. You can learn about more nutritional dishes for gestational diabetes if you sign up for our newsletter.  If you are in need of a diet meal plan for gestational diabetes meal plan.  This is a complete meal plan and recipes, it written by Mathea Ford RD/LD, find it on Amazon below.

Fruits and Vegetables Gestational Diabetes-Common Portion Sizes of Carbohydrate Choices

Fruits and Vegetables Gestational Diabetes

In gestational diabetes, it is important that you control what you eat. This does not necessarily mean that you should avoid eating certain foods. On the contrary, you can eat any type of food that you want, provided that you do so in moderation. This is to avoid raising your blood sugar levels to uncontrollable heights. The important thing is to keep a balanced diet with all the nutrients still present in your meal so that both you and your baby can grow healthy. On your diet try fruits and vegetables gestational diabetes!

That being said, carbohydrates are very important parts of your meal. It will give you the energy to do your daily activities, although too much of it can raise your blood sugar levels. Therefore, here are the serving sizes for fruits and vegetables.

Each fruit here contains 15 grams of carbohydrates:

Fruits

Size of One Serving

Apple, orange, pear, or peach 1 small piece the size of a tennis ball
Banana or mango ½ piece
Grapefruit 1 large piece
Small grapes 17 pieces
Honeydew or cantaloupe 1 cup
Raisins 2 tablespoons
Unsweetened, canned fruit ½ cup
Papaya or watermelon 1 cup cubed
Apple, orange, or grapefruit juice ½ cup
Applesauce ½ cup
Fresh blueberries or blackberries ¾ cup
Kiwi fruit 1 piece
Dried fruit ¼ cup
Fresh strawberries 1 ¼ cup
Lemon 1 large piece
Nectarine 1 cup
Diced pineapple ¾ cup
Canned pineapple 1/3 cup
Raspberries 1 cup
Fresh cherries 12 pieces
Dates 3 pieces
Figs 2 small pieces
Plum 2 pieces
Diced rhubarb 3 cups
Low-calorie cranberry juice 10 ounces
Unsweetened orange, grape, or pineapple juice 4 ounces
Unsweetened lemon juice 6 ounces

 

On the other hand, each vegetable here contains 5 grams of carbohydrates:

Vegetables

Size of One Serving

Raw broccoli 1 cup
Cooked broccoli ½ cup
Spinach and other greens 1 cup
Raw cauliflower 1 cup
Raw carrots 1 cup
Fresh pepper 1 cup
Canned tomato ½ cup
Leafy vegetables 1 cup
Tomato sauce 2 tablespoons
Vegetable or tomato juice 1 cup
Chopped asparagus 1 cup
Bamboo shoots, beans, Brussels sprouts, or bean sprouts ½ cup
Cabbage, celery, collard greens, green beans, fresh mushrooms, mustard greens, radishes, or squash 1 cup
Chili pepper 5 small pieces
Turnips, kale, leeks, okra, onion, sauerkraut, scallions, or rutabagas ½ cup

Take note that vegetables contain 1/3 of the carbohydrate of a regular serving of any other carbohydrate.  You can eat 3 times as much of them as other carbohydrates for the same 15 gm.  Vegetables and whole fruits also contain more fiber and keep you feeling full longer than other foods, so they are an important part of your overall plan to reduce your blood sugar.

Tips on Including Fruits and Vegetables in your Diet- Fruits and Vegetables Gestational Diabetes

  • Eat vegetables with only little or no fat, dressings, or sauces.
  • If you want to have salad dressing, choose the low-fat type.
  • You can also steam vegetables using low-fat broth.
  • When cooking vegetables, add a small piece of smoked turkey or lean ham instead of fat.
  • Sprinkle herbs and spices on your vegetable salad because these flavorings have almost no fat or calories.
  • If you do use fat in cooking vegetables, choose soft margarine, olive oil, or canola oil.
  • Eat smaller pieces of fruit rather than make them into juices.
  • If you are going to make a fruit juice, do not add any more sugar.

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Gestational Diabetes Bread and Starches-Common Portion Sizes of Carbohydrate Choices Part 1

Gestational Diabetes Bread and Starches

gestational diabetes breadA very important part of gestational diabetes therapy is watching your diet. As in any type of diabetes, the food that you eat should be moderated in order for you avoid sudden spikes of glucose in your blood, as your body’s insulin cannot cope up with the amount of glucose in your body. Carbohydrates are the main sources of glucose, but this does not mean that a woman with gestational diabetes is no longer allowed to eat carbohydrate-rich foods. A gestational diabetic can enjoy any type of food, as long as she controls the portion sizes of every food she eats.

If you are planning your gestational diabetes menu, here are the serving sizes of the most common breads and starches. All of the amounts here are equal to one serving, and each serving contains about 15 grams of carbohydrates.

Gestational Diabetes Bread

Size of One Serving

Whole grain bread 1 ounce slice
Cooked cereal ½ cup
Cooked rice or pasta 1/3 cup
Cooked beans, peas, or lentils ½ cup
Corn ½ cup
Large baked potato ¼ portion
Mashed potato ½ cup
Flour or corn tortilla 1 to 6 inches
Low fat crackers 6 squares
Hamburger or hot dog bun, English muffin, or frozen bagel ½ portion
Popcorn 3 cups
Rice cakes 2 pieces
Graham crackers 3 pieces
Concentrated bran 1/3 cup
Dinner roll 1 small portion
Broth-based soup 1 cup
Pretzels, potato chips, or tortilla chips 3/4 ounces
Sweet potatoes or yams ½ cup
Pancake 1 piece, 4 inches

It would also be very helpful if you consult your dietitian regarding your numbers of servings per day of carbohydrate, since this varies from person to person. However, in general, you can choose one kind of starch and have a maximum of three servings per meal, or you can choose several combinations of starches for a bit of variety.  If you find a gestational diabetes meal plan is helpful, you can read more about planning in our gestational diabetes diet meal plan.

Tips on Including Starches and Bread in Your Diet

  • If possible, choose pasta, cereals, and whole grain bread, since they are made of complex carbohydrates, hence not causing sudden spikes in blood glucose levels.
  • Fried and high-fat starches, such as tortilla chips, potato chips, and biscuits, should be eaten sparingly. Instead, you can opt for baked potatoes, pretzels, and low-fat muffins.
  • Instead of using sour cream on baked potato, try using a low-fat or fat-free yogurt.
  • For your dips and bread fillings, remember to use low-fat or fat-free substitutes, like low-fat mayonnaise or light margarine.
  • Use skim or low-fat milk together with your cereals.
  • If you are buying foods from the market, check out the nutrition facts on the food labels so that you have an idea how much carbohydrate and other nutrients are stored in the food that you eat. (remember, one serving carbohydrate = 15 gm of carbohydrate)
  • Check the serving sizes using measuring cups and spoons. You can also use a food scale if you have one.

Remember that planning your diet is an integral part in coping up with gestational diabetes.

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