Dining Out With Gestational Diabetes

Dining Out With Gestational Diabetes – Is it Worth the Effort or Not?

dining out with gestational diabetesBelieve it or not, you can enjoy a great evening out on the town with your significant other even if you have gestational diabetes. Dining out with gestational diabetes might seem like quite the challenge, but with so many people following high protein and low card diet these days; restaurants are offering meal options that are ideally suited for your needs. Keep these tips in minds to make dining out with gestational diabetes and even better bet or your next night out.

Avoid Over-Eating

The real secret for success, when following a diabetic diet, is to find ways to maintain lower blood glucose levels. Eating smaller meals, more frequently throughout the day is a great way to do this — especially if the foods you’re eating are not foods that are restricted on the diet you worked out with your doctor and nutritionist.

One important thing you can do to avoid over-eating is to ask your waiter for a carry out container as soon as your meal arrives. If you go ahead and half your meal from the start and have it put away, you won’t be nearly as tempted to overeat — plus you’ll have an excellent second meal later in the day or on another day in the near future.

Skip the Foods on Your Naughty List

You know that there are some foods that are better than other foods are to eat when dining out with gestational diabetes. Don’t eat them. It really is that simple. Skip the rich indulgent pasta dishes and don’t even think about looking at the desert items on the menu.

Self-control and discipline are great things to have in life. However, staring at the desert page of the menu when you know you shouldn’t indulge is just being mean to yourself. It’s completely unnecessary to torture yourself that way so don’t.

Choose Restaurants Wisely

Dining out with gestational diabetes is not something you want to take too lightly. While it’s possible to do without blowing your prescribed diet, it’s still a good idea to make a concerted effort to eat at places where you know there will be plenty of acceptable dishes available. The more choices you have, the less likely you are to feel deprived by dietary limitations.

Don’t Linger too Long

Dining out with gestational diabetes can be a lot of fun — especially if you’re bringing friends and family along. However, sitting at the table too long only increases the temptation to open your carryout box and start nibbling or order something new, and not-so-healthy in your situation from the menu. Enjoy your meal. Have a nice conversation. Then, call it a night (or afternoon) and leave. It’s not rude. It’s not inconsiderate. You have to make your baby a priority. Your friends and family should understand that more than anyone else should.

Dining out with gestational diabetes does present a few challenges. Fortunately, these challenges are fairly simple to overcome as long as you follow the helpful hints mentioned above.

For Additional Suggested Reading Dining Out With Gestational Diabetes

Diabetic Pregnancy Test

Diabetic Pregnancy Test – What Does it All Mean?

Women who are pregnant should go through a diabetic pregnancy test between weeks 24 and 28 of their pregnancy though, under certain circumstances, your physician may order the screening earlier during pregnancy. The purpose of the diabetic pregnancy test is to determine whether or not you have a condition known as gestational diabetes.

What is the Diabetic Pregnancy Test?

The test is fairly simple. You’ll be given a syrupy drink that tastes like a super-sweet orange soda. This drink contains 50g of glucose that is quickly absorbed into the blood. After an hour, you’ll have blood drawn from your arm and that blood will be tested to see how quickly the body metabolizes the glucose.

A follow-up diabetic pregnancy test, also referred to as a glucose tolerance test, is usually ordered if your glucose levels are greater than 130mg/dL. The follow-up test will require you to fast (eat no food) prior to taking the test and is often administered early in the morning as a result.

This diabetic pregnancy test is more involved and results in four blood draws over a three-hour period of time. If the results of at least two of the four blood draws are abnormal, the diagnosis is one of gestational diabetes.

What does it mean to have Gestational Diabetes?

When the results of your diabetic pregnancy test indicate gestational diabetes your doctor will then determine if dietary changes should be adequate to help you recover or if more direct intervention is necessary. Early in pregnancy, most women can control blood sugar levels with dietary chances and exercises. As the pregnancy progresses and hormones begin to build up, more direct intervention in the form of pills or insulin shots may be required.

The goal of the diabetic pregnancy test is to get your blood sugar levels under control so that you can avoid certain complications that may result from high blood sugar including high birth weight in the baby, high bilirubin levels, extra red blood cells, and low blood calcium levels for the baby.

Are there Other Concerns Regarding Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes affects about 18 percent of pregnant women. Some women, depending on family history, weight, age, pregnancy history, and ethnic group; are more susceptible to developing this condition. According to the CDC, women who have gestational diabetes are at an increased risk (35-60 percent increase) of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 to 20 years. Education is critical in avoiding this outcome, which is another reason the diabetic pregnancy test is so import — to serve as a warning ahead of the fact.

Even if your diabetic pregnancy test determines that you have gestational diabetes, it isn’t a guarantee that you’ll eventually develop type two diabetes. It is a sign, however, that now is a good time to begin making changes in your diet and fitness routine to reduce that risk. Start following a diabetic friendly diet while pregnant and continue following the diet afterwards to reduce your risks of developing diabetes and the complications that often go along with it.

MATHEA FORD-REGISTERED DIETITIAN AND AUTHOR

Diabetic Pregnancy Test

1800 Calorie Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational diabetes is a disease that poses significant challenges to both the mother and the developing baby. This condition can be managed with lifestyle and diet modifications. One of the most reliable and recommended diet modification plans is the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet. This diet helps to maintain low glucose levels in the mother’s body, accelerates metabolism and may help the mother lose weight. Pregnant mothers who have gestational diabetes should stick to this health diet to minimize any serious diabetes related conditions.

About the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet plan

1800 calorie gestational diabetes dietThis diet plan gives a specific amount of calories that a mother should take each day to control gestational diabetes. As the name suggests, a mother should take 1800 calories each day. The 1800 calories are comprised of 50% carbohydrates (900 calories), 30% fats (540 calories) and 20% proteins (360 calories). This meal plan aims at reducing glucose or carbohydrates consumed by a pregnant mother suffering from the condition. Additionally, it encourages low fat intake and high fiber intake.

Carbohydrates-1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

The 1800 diet plan requires a pregnant mother to have three or four servings of meals rich in carbohydrates. One or two servings should be snacks taken between meals. A good example of one serving of carbohydrates is a slice of bread, a cup of soup, 1/3 cup of pasta or rice, a small fruit, a half cup of canned fruits, a cup of leafy vegetables, a half cup of starchy vegetables and a cup of milk.

Fats-1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

For this type of diet, fats should contribute less than sixty grams or 540 calories daily. A mother should focus on beneficial fats like olive oil, canola oil, peanut or soybean oils. Fried foods should be avoided at all costs because they contain high amounts of trans fats. Butter and fatty meats should also be avoided because they are high in saturated fats. However, a mother should not cut fats all in all. The brain requires omega-3 fatty foods for development. In general, two tablespoons of vegetable oil are sufficient. The rest of the fat calories can be obtained from lean meat, eggs, fish and dairies.

Proteins-1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

2 or 3 servings of protein daily are sufficient to manage gestational diabetes. A mother should make sure that one serving of protein has fish, poultry or meat. Intake of proteins should be spread out throughout the day, just like carbohydrates, because proteins help in managing post-meal blood glucose. One serving of protein can either be one egg or 2 tablespoons of peanut butter or a half cup of beans.
The 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet requires a mother to burn up energy. As such, it is vital for a mother to jog, walk, cycle, exercise bicycling or dance to burn up energy. Maintaining an 1800 calorie diet and exercising requires discipline. When the two are observed, it becomes easy to manage gestational diabetes and to shed unnecessary weight. The advantage of the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet is that a mother gets to enjoy all types of good foods but in limited quantities. The diet plan keeps the body healthy and the taste buds happy.

I have a plan that conforms closely to the 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet it is my plan for 2000 calories.  Many OB’s subscribe 2000 or 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet but they are close in calories as long as they are managed.

For meal planning for gestational diabetes click here 1800 calorie gestational diabetes diet

 

I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

i have gestational diabetesGestational diabetes has become a common problem among pregnant woman now days due to inactive lifestyles and unhealthy food habits. Not many people realize, if such conditions are not controlled in the initial stage, they can lead to great health complications in the future. Without amiss, it should be noted that bringing small changes in the diet can help you get over your condition in a very smooth and subtle way.

Here are some general dietary guidelines for those looking for an answer to:

I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

Eat Variety Of Foods

Although, a pregnant woman is always expected to eat a nutritional diet, it becomes all the more important when she is suffering from gestational diabetes. Make sure you create a balanced gestational diabetes diet chart or get a gestational diabetes diet meal plan to ensure that you are taking right amount of nutrients at the right time. According to dietitians and experts, it is always advised to include at least three small-size meals and four snacks every day.
Include Right Amount Of Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are good for your body if you take them in the right quantity. Eating a diet rich in carbs will ensure that your body is getting all the necessary nutrients required for the growth and development of your fetus. Also, a carb managed diet is also beneficial in controlling the effects of gestational diabetes. Include whole grain cereals, fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet. Spread the carbohydrate intake evenly into 3-4 servings throughout the day.

Don’t Ever Skip Meals

A lot of women have a habit of skipping breakfast to maintain weight. This is absolutely wrong and skipping meals actually adds to weight gain. It is important to understand that your body has certain needs that need to be fulfilled at the right time. Skipping meals is not an option at all! You should be consistent about your meals and prepare a proper gestational diabetes meal plan to make sure that you are eating the right amount of food. It will keep your blood sugar in control and make you feel more energetic throughout the day. I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

Include High-fiber and Protein Rich Foods

Most women think, I have gestational diabetes, so I should start eating in control.  Hence, they start compromising with their daily nutritional diet. It is imperative to know that most of your body is made of proteins and thus you should never miss on including good amount of protein in your diet. On the other hand, eating high-fiber food is also good as it helps to maintain your blood sugar level during gestational diabetes. Include fresh fruits, vegetables, cereals, dried peas, legumes and beans in your diet. Spread them evenly into three-four meals to get the maximum benefit of each. I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

Limit Your Intake Of Artificial Drinks

Artificial drinks such as soda, flavored teas, and artificial fruit juices can play havoc to your gestational diabetes problem. Such drinks can immediately increase your blood sugar level, creating complications for you and your baby. Consult your doctor on using artificial drinks such as juices and sweeteners if you don’t have any other option. Apart from this, you can focus more on fresh fruit juices, decaffeinated tea, and water. I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

We hope these tips would have got you the answer for your query, “I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?” Keep in mind all these tips and you will be able to cope up with your gestational diabetes condition with ease.

If you still have any doubt on meal plans, simply visit my page on gestational diabetes diet meal plans and we can provide a great resource to your meal planning. 

See it by clicking here! I Have Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes Breakfast Diet Meal Plan

slice of rye breadGestational Diabetes Breakfast

Gestational diabetes is a very common condition that occurs among pregnant women. If not controlled effectively, gestational diabetes may cause problems during pregnancy and may also affect the child and mother later in life.  A gestational diabetes breakfast to start your day is very important. Just like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes mainly affects the use of glucose in the body. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that it is properly managed in order to avoid passing the excess blood glucose to the unborn child. In case the excess glucose is passed on to the child, it may cause a condition known as fat baby or macrosomia. These babies are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, obesity, and breathing problems later in life. On the other hand, the baby is more likely to have hypoglycemia and/or damage to the shoulders during delivery.

Importance of breakfast to women with gestational diabetes

4.1.1A gestational diabetes breakfast menu needs to be very flexible in order to ensure that it can be easily adjusted to fit the current situation. Since no food is taken during sleep, it is normal for the blood sugar level to vary from the recommended levels (In most cases, it I lower than recommended). In such cases, it is critical to ensure a corresponding adjustment in the sugar level and carbohydrate of the breakfast meal in order to maintain the amount of glucose in the blood at a healthy level. Therefore, the carbohydrate-controlled plan needs to be individualized based on every woman’s preferences and needs. This is mainly because the type, amount and distribution of food during breakfast will affect blood glucose control throughout the day. However, due to
increased hormonal activity, carbohydrates are not tolerated well during breakfast. Though some carbohydrates are necessary during every meal, the bulk of breakfast needs to be comprised of protein in order to achieve better glucose control.

Breakfast foods for gestational diabetes

When coming up with a breakfast plan for a person with gestational diabetes, every dietitian aims at maintaining stable glucose levels throughout the day in order to provide enough energy and ensure provision of adequate nutrients for the mother and unborn baby.To avoid a sudden rush of energy, it is vital to balance carbohydrates with dairy and proteins.

Possible breakfast combinations include:

2 slices of wholegrain waffle, peanut butter spread and ½ cup of non-fat skimmed milk.
A slice of whole wheat bread, a hardboiled egg and ½ cup of non-fat skimmed milk.
Egg breakfast taco and turkey sausage
Egg sandwich and Canadian bacon on whole-wheat bread

It is very important to ensure that only sugarless dairy products are consumed. On the other hand, the milk should be skimmed with a low fat concentration. Avoid all beverages that increase the risk of diabetes such as alcohol, tea and wine and minimize the intake of fast foods.

Breakfast tips for gestational diabetes

Don’t drink fruit juice or eat fruits.
Avoid cereal.
Ensure that your breakfast has protein.
Eat a small (in terms of quantity) breakfast meal
Consume whole-grain bread products.

Hormones that boost blood sugar level are normally released in the morning making it quite hard to control blood glucose. Therefore, you need to follow these breakfast tips in order to control gestational diabetes more effectively.

Controlling Your Gestational Diabetes – 3 Tips For The Best Outcomes

Tips For Controlling Your Gestational Diabetes

controlling your gestational diabetesYou hold back the fear in your heart when you prick your finger, hoping that it won’t be too high.  Your heart soars or sinks, depending on the number.  You feel guilty about it and wonder what you might have eaten to make it go wrong.

Never fear, you have another day and another meal to get it right.  You do need to get your gestational diabetes under control, though.  It’s important.

1.  Following a meal plan can make a world of difference. Instead of always thinking about what you cannot have, you can plan and eat those things that support you and your child growing in your womb.

2.  Walking for just 15 minutes 3 times a day will bring your blood sugar down.  Your best times to walk are right after a meal, as your system is breaking down the blood sugar, your muscles start to use it better and bring the glucose out of your blood stream and into your cells.  That’s where it is supposed to be anyway.

3.  Reduce your stress.  Always beating up on yourself will never improve your health or your well being.  You will make a mistake or two, you will be tempted to eat a donut, and you will have a high blood sugar.  You are not perfect, but you are getting better every day.  Stress increases blood sugar levels too!

If you are searching for more information on controlling your gestational diabetes and keeping your baby and you healthy then please sign up for my free EBOOK which you will also get my weekly newsletter.

For a complete gestational diabetes meal plan buy my book here from Amazon, your trusted source for purchasing anything!

Mathea Ford RD/LD USA

What Will My Baby Weigh With Gestational Diabetes?- Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Because gestational diabetes is a condition affecting pregnant women, this condition can also affect the babies of these women. As such, this might pose several complications for the baby, including increased birth weight, labor difficulties, hypoglycemia after birth, and risk for developing diabetes later on in life.

“Big” Baby-Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Remember that glucose can cross the placental barrier, and too much glucose can make your baby fat. One of the complications that babies can have if gestational diabetes remains uncontrolled is macrosomia or a big baby. Macrosomia is defined as having a birth weight of 4500 grams or more. That translates to a weight of 9 pounds and 14 ounces, when the normal birth weight is only around 3400 grams.

Baby Weight With Gestational DiabetesAs a result of the weight of the baby, this might further lead to several complications. If the baby achieves this weight at around the seventh week of pregnancy, this might prompt obstetricians to deliver the baby prematurely since staying in the womb for a longer period of time poses some danger to the mother, such as possible uterine rupture. The baby will then have to be placed inside an incubator since his lung surfactants have not yet fully matured. Baby weight with gestational diabetes is directly related to blood sugar control in the mother.

If the baby reaches full term, the huge birth weight can still pose a problem on labor and delivery. Labor may be difficult since the baby will probably not be able to pass through the vaginal canal. Hence, Caesarean section would be recommended. If the mother pushes through with normal spontaneous delivery, there is a risk for the baby to have shoulder dystocia or shoulder fracture. Usually, the baby’s head is the biggest part of his body. However, for macrosomic babies, the shoulders become wider than the head, thus not being able to pass through swiftly into the birth canal. Although the shoulder fracture can easily heal because the babes bones are still soft and not yet fully formed, improper alignment can lead to bone defects as the baby grows older.

Other Complications-Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Aside from possible injuries during delivery, the baby can also suffer from hypoglycemia immediately after delivery. The baby has gotten used to high glucose levels inside the womb. As a result, his pancreas responds by producing high levels of insulin to use up all the glucose coming from the mother. When the baby is born, the pancreas will still continue to produce high amounts of insulin as it still takes some time to get used to the outside environment. As a result, the baby can suffer from hypoglycemia or low blood sugar during his first few days of life. This should be carefully monitored by health care providers.

Studies also show that babies borne out of gestational diabetic mothers have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus later on in life. However, if you control your blood sugar properly during pregnancy, this risk could be lessened. Therefore, proper treatment and control of gestational diabetes is very important.

Learn more about the complications of gestational diabetes for both mothers and babies through our EBOOK and newsletter.

If you think you are ready to start on a gestational diabetes diet meal planner, then click through here!  Amazon is a very popular site and they will make sure you receive your copy promptly!

What Caused My Gestational Diabetes?

What Caused My Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnant women and poses risks to both the developing baby and the mother. This type of diabetes is characterized by high levels of glucose in the blood. This can result into problems during pregnancy, at birth and in future. Many mothers will tend to ask themselves this. What caused my gestational diabetes?

What Caused My Gestational Diabetes?-Causes of gestational diabetes

what caused my gestational diabetesDuring pregnancy, women have some hormonal changes. This hormonal changes cause gestational diabetes. When some hormones made in the placenta (organ that links the developing baby to the mother’s uterus via the umbilical cord) increase, it becomes hard for insulin to manage the new levels of blood glucose. This situation is referred to as insulin resistance. As the pregnancy advances, the placenta increases in size thereby producing more hormones. Consequently, insulin resistance increases insulin resistance. Normally, a mother’s pancreas has the ability to prevail over insulin resistance by producing higher levels of insulin (approximately three times the regular amount). If, on the other hand, the mother’s pancreas fails to produce the necessary amounts of insulin to prevail over the effects of the high levels of insulin, blood glucose will increase leading to gestational diabetes. Luckily, pregnant women can take several precautions to control blood glucose and minimize health risks associated with gestational diabetes. A meal plan is important in preventing and managing gestational diabetes.

Meal plan essentials

Meal plan for pregnant mothers are built around a few essential ideas:

Carbohydrate issues: All types of foods have different combinations of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Carbohydrates affect blood glucose at a faster rate than proteins and fats. Proteins and fats affect blood glucose slowly and over a long period of time. Based on this fact, mothers should regulate intake of carbohydrate-rich foods.
Nutrition issues: It is necessary for pregnant mothers to choose healthy food options. Healthy foods contain nutrients that control gestational diabetes and sustain development and growth of the developing baby. A good meal plan should have healthy food choices.
Timing and portions issues: It is important for pregnant mothers to control their gestational diabetes by managing their eating patterns. A good meal plan outlines when to eat and the amount to eat.

Six important steps to follow:

-Eat less, frequent snacks and meals. Pregnant mothers should eat in intervals of 2 to 3 hours. Foods rich in carbohydrates should be spread evenly in order to maintain stable levels of blood glucose.
-Eat some healthy proteins. Proteins even out or balance blood glucose, make pregnant mothers feel satisfied and energized all day.
-Eat less breakfast. In the morning, blood glucose is often high. Breakfast should be light and have fewer carbohydrates to offset the high levels of blood glucose. Pregnant mothers should take some mid-morning snacks 2 hours after breakfast.
-Eat foods with high amounts of fiber. Pregnant mothers should eat breads, cereals, vegetables and fruits in their evening or afternoon meals for fiber.
-Avoid sweets and sugars. Fruit juices, soft drinks and desserts increase blood glucose rapidly. Pregnant mothers should avoid fruit juices during breakfast and soft drinks or desserts as they increase blood glucose without providing significant nutritional value.
-Avoid fats particularly if you have gained excess weight. Pregnant mothers ought to eat lean protein foods, avoid frying foods and shun convenience foods.

Looking for assistance with a gestational diabetes diet meal plan try this book!

 

What Should Be My Calorie Intake With Gestational Diabetes?

What Should Be My Calorie Intake With Gestational Diabetes?

Just like in any other type of diabetes, women with gestational diabetes should watch what they eat. This is an important facet in the control and treatment of gestational diabetes. Neglecting you dietary restrictions and requirements will only worsen your gestational diabetes, leading to complications not just for you but also for your baby. To prevent these things from happening, health care providers and nutritionists advise women with gestational diabetes to watch their calorie intake. Thus, What Should Be My Calorie Intake With Gestational Diabetes? Special attention is paid to carbohydrates, since these are the sources of glucose that women with gestational diabetes are unable to fully utilize.

Assessment of gestational diabetes-calorie intake with gestational diabetes

Before giving you a meal plan and a list of foods to avoid, your health care provider will first assess your body weight, your total weight gain during pregnancy, and your eating habits before making recommendations on your diet. Remember, no two nutritionists will give you the same recommendations, since there are no hard and fast rules when it comes to a gestational diabetes diet. The food choices may vary, as long as you stick to the calorie intake recommended for you.

calorie intake with gestational diabetesYour eating habits will also make a large impact on your dietary recommendations. For example, if you are the type of person who gains weight quickly, then you might be asked to cut back on your caloric intake and to engage in exercises safe for pregnancy. If you have a sweet tooth, your doctor will recommend cutting back on those sugars and eating more fresh produce and lean proteins.

Calorie intake with gestational diabetics

For normal pregnant women, the recommended daily caloric intake is 2600 calories. Since you have gestational diabetes, doctors recommend having a slightly less caloric intake of 2000 to 2400 calories. It is only slightly lower than the normal recommendation because you are pregnant. As such, women are not advised to go on a restrictive diet during pregnancy, as this can adversely affect the health of your baby. Hence, doctors who recommend a lower calorie intake of 1500 to 1800 calories per day should know that they are putting both the mother and the baby in grave danger.

Although there is only a slight decrease in the daily caloric recommendation for women, what matters is how you distribute these calories into carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

Breaking down the calories-Calorie Intake With Gestational Diabetes?

In general, you have to watch your carbohydrate intake, since too much carbs will lead to an increase in your blood sugar levels. Your total carbohydrate intake per day should make up less than half of your total caloric intake. This means around 175 grams of carbohydrates per day, evenly spaced out throughout the day into 15 to 30 grams per meal. Eat more vegetables, high-fiber foods, and whole grain carbohydrates. Ditch the sugary ones.

As for protein, you can have two to three servings per day. Protein-rich foods include meat, fish, eggs, nuts, and dry beans. Remember to trim all visible fat from the meat and, as much as possible, go skinless. For fats, limit your intake but do not totally remove them from your diet as they provide long-term energy for growth and brain development.

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Is It Normal For My Breasts To Hurt While Breastfeeding?

As we all know, breastfeeding is good for our babies. It has many advantages for the baby, since breast milk is full of nutrients that cannot otherwise be found in formula milk. However, what most people do not know is that breastfeeding can be a little uncomfortable. Some may experience pain while breastfeeding, wondering whether it is normal or already an alarming indication of something gone awry. Hence, here are some of the things that might make breastfeeding uncomfortable, but totally normal:

  • Sore nipples. It is normal for women to have sore nipples while breastfeeding. Remember that your babies suck your nipples while you feed them with breast milk. Naturally, this can feel uncomfortable during the first few times that you feed your baby since you are still getting used to it. However, after some days, it would not hurt as much. Some people say that breastfeeding only hurts if your baby did not latch on properly or you have poor positioning. However, most mothers say that this is a myth since breastfeeding hurts all the same, whether or not the technique is executed well. Nevertheless, you should take note that the pain should not be too extreme that it will make you dread breastfeeding your baby. If such pain is experienced, you should consult your doctor as this might be indicative of yeast infection.
  • Full breasts. Whenever your breasts are full of milk, it will undoubtedly feel heavy and a little painful. Hence, you have to prevent breast engorgement by feeding your baby even if you have to wake him up. Schedule a constant time that you will feed your baby, like every four to six hours. At first, your baby might cry a lot, but he will eventually get used to the routine. You can also tenderly massage your breasts or manually express them for later use.
  • Milk leakage. When your breasts are full and you cannot express it immediately, there may be instances when your nipples might leak milk. This can happen during the most inconvenient times and inopportune places. While you can breastfeed your baby in public, there are still some cultures who do not accept this public display, hence becoming a source of embarrassment. To solve this, do not forget to cover yourself during breastfeeding.

In spite of all the aforementioned things, the advantages of breastfeeding weigh more than its discomforts. One solution to all these discomforts is to make use of a breast pump like Medela in order to still feed breast milk to your baby without having to go through all the discomforts. Your baby will no longer have problems with latching on since he will just drink milk from the feeding bottle, hence sparing you from sore nipples and the risk of getting cracked nipples. Whenever your breasts are full and your baby is asleep, you can use a breast pump to empty your breasts of milk and prevent them from engorging. Milk leakage can also be prevented since you do not have to go out with full breasts anymore as you can express breast milk using a breast pump. Using a breast pump is also less time-consuming compared to breastfeeding.

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