Diabetic Pregnancy Test

Diabetic Pregnancy Test – What Does it All Mean?

Women who are pregnant should go through a diabetic pregnancy test between weeks 24 and 28 of their pregnancy though, under certain circumstances, your physician may order the screening earlier during pregnancy. The purpose of the diabetic pregnancy test is to determine whether or not you have a condition known as gestational diabetes.

What is the Diabetic Pregnancy Test?

The test is fairly simple. You’ll be given a syrupy drink that tastes like a super-sweet orange soda. This drink contains 50g of glucose that is quickly absorbed into the blood. After an hour, you’ll have blood drawn from your arm and that blood will be tested to see how quickly the body metabolizes the glucose.

A follow-up diabetic pregnancy test, also referred to as a glucose tolerance test, is usually ordered if your glucose levels are greater than 130mg/dL. The follow-up test will require you to fast (eat no food) prior to taking the test and is often administered early in the morning as a result.

This diabetic pregnancy test is more involved and results in four blood draws over a three-hour period of time. If the results of at least two of the four blood draws are abnormal, the diagnosis is one of gestational diabetes.

What does it mean to have Gestational Diabetes?

When the results of your diabetic pregnancy test indicate gestational diabetes your doctor will then determine if dietary changes should be adequate to help you recover or if more direct intervention is necessary. Early in pregnancy, most women can control blood sugar levels with dietary chances and exercises. As the pregnancy progresses and hormones begin to build up, more direct intervention in the form of pills or insulin shots may be required.

The goal of the diabetic pregnancy test is to get your blood sugar levels under control so that you can avoid certain complications that may result from high blood sugar including high birth weight in the baby, high bilirubin levels, extra red blood cells, and low blood calcium levels for the baby.

Are there Other Concerns Regarding Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes affects about 18 percent of pregnant women. Some women, depending on family history, weight, age, pregnancy history, and ethnic group; are more susceptible to developing this condition. According to the CDC, women who have gestational diabetes are at an increased risk (35-60 percent increase) of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 to 20 years. Education is critical in avoiding this outcome, which is another reason the diabetic pregnancy test is so import — to serve as a warning ahead of the fact.

Even if your diabetic pregnancy test determines that you have gestational diabetes, it isn’t a guarantee that you’ll eventually develop type two diabetes. It is a sign, however, that now is a good time to begin making changes in your diet and fitness routine to reduce that risk. Start following a diabetic friendly diet while pregnant and continue following the diet afterwards to reduce your risks of developing diabetes and the complications that often go along with it.

MATHEA FORD-REGISTERED DIETITIAN AND AUTHOR

Diabetic Pregnancy Test

About Mathea

Thanks for listening, I am a registered dietitian who had gestational diabetes and I want to help you find your way through this tough time. I have written several books and I have a book on Amazon about Gestational Diabetes Meal Plans.

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