Dining Out With Gestational Diabetes

Dining Out With Gestational Diabetes – Is it Worth the Effort or Not?

dining out with gestational diabetesBelieve it or not, you can enjoy a great evening out on the town with your significant other even if you have gestational diabetes. Dining out with gestational diabetes might seem like quite the challenge, but with so many people following high protein and low card diet these days; restaurants are offering meal options that are ideally suited for your needs. Keep these tips in minds to make dining out with gestational diabetes and even better bet or your next night out.

Avoid Over-Eating

The real secret for success, when following a diabetic diet, is to find ways to maintain lower blood glucose levels. Eating smaller meals, more frequently throughout the day is a great way to do this — especially if the foods you’re eating are not foods that are restricted on the diet you worked out with your doctor and nutritionist.

One important thing you can do to avoid over-eating is to ask your waiter for a carry out container as soon as your meal arrives. If you go ahead and half your meal from the start and have it put away, you won’t be nearly as tempted to overeat — plus you’ll have an excellent second meal later in the day or on another day in the near future.

Skip the Foods on Your Naughty List

You know that there are some foods that are better than other foods are to eat when dining out with gestational diabetes. Don’t eat them. It really is that simple. Skip the rich indulgent pasta dishes and don’t even think about looking at the desert items on the menu.

Self-control and discipline are great things to have in life. However, staring at the desert page of the menu when you know you shouldn’t indulge is just being mean to yourself. It’s completely unnecessary to torture yourself that way so don’t.

Choose Restaurants Wisely

Dining out with gestational diabetes is not something you want to take too lightly. While it’s possible to do without blowing your prescribed diet, it’s still a good idea to make a concerted effort to eat at places where you know there will be plenty of acceptable dishes available. The more choices you have, the less likely you are to feel deprived by dietary limitations.

Don’t Linger too Long

Dining out with gestational diabetes can be a lot of fun — especially if you’re bringing friends and family along. However, sitting at the table too long only increases the temptation to open your carryout box and start nibbling or order something new, and not-so-healthy in your situation from the menu. Enjoy your meal. Have a nice conversation. Then, call it a night (or afternoon) and leave. It’s not rude. It’s not inconsiderate. You have to make your baby a priority. Your friends and family should understand that more than anyone else should.

Dining out with gestational diabetes does present a few challenges. Fortunately, these challenges are fairly simple to overcome as long as you follow the helpful hints mentioned above.

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Meal Planning with Gestational Diabetes

Meal Planning with Gestational Diabetes

meal planning with gestational diabetesGestational diabetes is a condition in which women without previously diagnosed diabetes exhibit high blood glucose levels during pregnancy. It is an often complicated and intimidating condition to deal with, and requires following a strict diet plan to ensure the safety of both mother and child.

Uncontrolled gestational diabetes can put a mother at risk for a myriad of complications including pre clampsia, jaundice, low blood sugar, and delivery complications. Some babies born to mothers with unchecked gestational diabetes can grow larger than a normal baby and cause complications for both mother and baby during delivery.

A controlled diet is often the first step to controlling gestational diabetes. Every pregnant woman should follow certain guidelines when eating for two, but for women with gestational diabetes it is especially important to follow a healthy dietary plan. Most doctors will recommend eating three moderately sized meals per day with two or three snacks dispersed throughout the day. Meals should include whole grains, fresh fruits, lean proteins, and lots of vegetables.

Carbohydrates will need to be heavily monitored and limited. Carbohydrates are not just limited to baked goods, though. A lot of foods are high in carbohydrates such as breads, cereals, pasta, potatoes, fruit, and milk. For pregnant women with gestational diabetes, it is a good idea to plan out your meals ahead of time. This will help you keep on track with what you are eating, and also ensure that you do not skip meals or snacks. Skipping a meal or snack can be detrimental to keeping your blood glucose levels in check.

Here are some ideas to help you plan your meals:

Breakfast:
Whole grains such as steel cut oatmeal, bran cereal, or two slices of whole wheat toast. A protein such as a hard boiled or scrambled egg, or a tablespoon of peanut butter.  A small handful of fresh berries or half a grapefruit.

Example: One cup of hot bran cereal topped with a small handful of fresh berries and vanilla almond milk.

Mid-Morning Snack:
Snacks should be mostly protein based. Try to stay away from chips or cookies.

Example: A handful of raw almonds or six saltine crackers with a tablespoon of peanut butter.

Lunch:
One ounce of protein and lots of fresh veggies make a delicious, satisfying, and gestational diabetic friendly lunch.

Example: Tossed salad with one ounce of grilled chicken and two tablespoons of low fat dressing.

Afternoon Snack:
Fresh cut veggies make a great healthy and filling snack.
Example: One cup of baby carrots with two tablespoons of hummus. (Try using a low sodium brand or making your own)

Dinner:
Three ounces of a lean protein of your choice, ½ to one cup of starch, and as many vegetables as you can eat. You can include a small amount of fat, such as one tablespoon of margarine or two tablespoons of a low fat salad dressing.

Example: Three ounce turkey breast with bread crumbs served with half a cup of cooked quinoa with mushrooms and mixed vegetables sautéed in one tablespoon of olive oil. Try a baked apple with oats and cinnamon for dessert.

Before Bed Snack:
It is highly recommended for expectant mothers to eat a before bed snack. It will help keep your blood glucose levels maintained while you are sleeping, and can sometimes help prevent morning sickness.

Example: One slice of whole wheat bread topped with a sliced hard-boiled egg.

Eating for two with gestational diabetes can be filling and enjoyable. By following recommended meal plans, you can ensure a healthy mom and baby.

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I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

i have gestational diabetesGestational diabetes has become a common problem among pregnant woman now days due to inactive lifestyles and unhealthy food habits. Not many people realize, if such conditions are not controlled in the initial stage, they can lead to great health complications in the future. Without amiss, it should be noted that bringing small changes in the diet can help you get over your condition in a very smooth and subtle way.

Here are some general dietary guidelines for those looking for an answer to:

I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

Eat Variety Of Foods

Although, a pregnant woman is always expected to eat a nutritional diet, it becomes all the more important when she is suffering from gestational diabetes. Make sure you create a balanced gestational diabetes diet chart or get a gestational diabetes diet meal plan to ensure that you are taking right amount of nutrients at the right time. According to dietitians and experts, it is always advised to include at least three small-size meals and four snacks every day.
Include Right Amount Of Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are good for your body if you take them in the right quantity. Eating a diet rich in carbs will ensure that your body is getting all the necessary nutrients required for the growth and development of your fetus. Also, a carb managed diet is also beneficial in controlling the effects of gestational diabetes. Include whole grain cereals, fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet. Spread the carbohydrate intake evenly into 3-4 servings throughout the day.

Don’t Ever Skip Meals

A lot of women have a habit of skipping breakfast to maintain weight. This is absolutely wrong and skipping meals actually adds to weight gain. It is important to understand that your body has certain needs that need to be fulfilled at the right time. Skipping meals is not an option at all! You should be consistent about your meals and prepare a proper gestational diabetes meal plan to make sure that you are eating the right amount of food. It will keep your blood sugar in control and make you feel more energetic throughout the day. I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

Include High-fiber and Protein Rich Foods

Most women think, I have gestational diabetes, so I should start eating in control.  Hence, they start compromising with their daily nutritional diet. It is imperative to know that most of your body is made of proteins and thus you should never miss on including good amount of protein in your diet. On the other hand, eating high-fiber food is also good as it helps to maintain your blood sugar level during gestational diabetes. Include fresh fruits, vegetables, cereals, dried peas, legumes and beans in your diet. Spread them evenly into three-four meals to get the maximum benefit of each. I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

Limit Your Intake Of Artificial Drinks

Artificial drinks such as soda, flavored teas, and artificial fruit juices can play havoc to your gestational diabetes problem. Such drinks can immediately increase your blood sugar level, creating complications for you and your baby. Consult your doctor on using artificial drinks such as juices and sweeteners if you don’t have any other option. Apart from this, you can focus more on fresh fruit juices, decaffeinated tea, and water. I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?

We hope these tips would have got you the answer for your query, “I Have Gestational Diabetes – What Should I Eat?” Keep in mind all these tips and you will be able to cope up with your gestational diabetes condition with ease.

If you still have any doubt on meal plans, simply visit my page on gestational diabetes diet meal plans and we can provide a great resource to your meal planning. 

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What Should Be My Calorie Intake With Gestational Diabetes?

What Should Be My Calorie Intake With Gestational Diabetes?

Just like in any other type of diabetes, women with gestational diabetes should watch what they eat. This is an important facet in the control and treatment of gestational diabetes. Neglecting you dietary restrictions and requirements will only worsen your gestational diabetes, leading to complications not just for you but also for your baby. To prevent these things from happening, health care providers and nutritionists advise women with gestational diabetes to watch their calorie intake. Thus, What Should Be My Calorie Intake With Gestational Diabetes? Special attention is paid to carbohydrates, since these are the sources of glucose that women with gestational diabetes are unable to fully utilize.

Assessment of gestational diabetes-calorie intake with gestational diabetes

Before giving you a meal plan and a list of foods to avoid, your health care provider will first assess your body weight, your total weight gain during pregnancy, and your eating habits before making recommendations on your diet. Remember, no two nutritionists will give you the same recommendations, since there are no hard and fast rules when it comes to a gestational diabetes diet. The food choices may vary, as long as you stick to the calorie intake recommended for you.

calorie intake with gestational diabetesYour eating habits will also make a large impact on your dietary recommendations. For example, if you are the type of person who gains weight quickly, then you might be asked to cut back on your caloric intake and to engage in exercises safe for pregnancy. If you have a sweet tooth, your doctor will recommend cutting back on those sugars and eating more fresh produce and lean proteins.

Calorie intake with gestational diabetics

For normal pregnant women, the recommended daily caloric intake is 2600 calories. Since you have gestational diabetes, doctors recommend having a slightly less caloric intake of 2000 to 2400 calories. It is only slightly lower than the normal recommendation because you are pregnant. As such, women are not advised to go on a restrictive diet during pregnancy, as this can adversely affect the health of your baby. Hence, doctors who recommend a lower calorie intake of 1500 to 1800 calories per day should know that they are putting both the mother and the baby in grave danger.

Although there is only a slight decrease in the daily caloric recommendation for women, what matters is how you distribute these calories into carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

Breaking down the calories-Calorie Intake With Gestational Diabetes?

In general, you have to watch your carbohydrate intake, since too much carbs will lead to an increase in your blood sugar levels. Your total carbohydrate intake per day should make up less than half of your total caloric intake. This means around 175 grams of carbohydrates per day, evenly spaced out throughout the day into 15 to 30 grams per meal. Eat more vegetables, high-fiber foods, and whole grain carbohydrates. Ditch the sugary ones.

As for protein, you can have two to three servings per day. Protein-rich foods include meat, fish, eggs, nuts, and dry beans. Remember to trim all visible fat from the meat and, as much as possible, go skinless. For fats, limit your intake but do not totally remove them from your diet as they provide long-term energy for growth and brain development.

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Why Should I Care if I Have Gestational Diabetes?

Why Should I Care if I Have Gestational Diabetes?

Since gestational diabetes only occurs to pregnant women, most women have no idea what this means. Although many are familiar with what diabetes is in general, they do not know what to expect when it comes to gestational diabetes. Questions plague the mind of a woman who is newly-diagnosed with gestational diabetes: Is it the same as the common type 2 diabetes? What are its effects on me and my baby? Should I be alarmed? Should I even care? The answer to the last question is very simple: Yes, you should care. Just like any other types of diseases, you should take some precautionary measures if you are diagnosed with this condition. In order to help you understand the gravity to the situation, here are some information on what gestational diabetes is.

What is gestational diabetes?

Gestational diabetes is a condition that manifests only during pregnancy. Just like the more commonly known diabetes type 2, gestational diabetes involves an increase in blood glucose or sugar levels. This is because the body cannot produce adequate amounts of insulin to match the glucose intake of the pregnant woman, since a pregnant woman’s insulin needs is multiplied to two or three times the normal insulin requirement. Moreover, a pregnant woman releases certain hormones that antagonize the action of insulin. Hence, control of blood sugar is important for women with gestational diabetes.

What are the effects of gestational diabetes?

So what if you have gestational diabetes? Remember that since you are carrying a child in your womb, this means that the effects of gestational diabetes might not only manifest on you, but also on your child. Glucose can cross the placental barrier since this is the main source of nutrients for your growing fetus. The child of a mother with gestational diabetes tends to be larger in size because of the amount of glucose that they get. This can pose some problems during delivery. If the baby is already too large before it becomes term, this might prompt the doctor to deliver the baby prematurely. If the baby reaches full term, s/he may be delivered via Caesarean section because s/he cannot fit inside the birth canal. Normal spontaneous delivery might injure the baby. Moreover, your baby can have periods of hypoglycemia during his/her first few days since his/her pancreas have gotten used to producing large amounts of insulin while still in the womb.

You can become affected as well. Those who have gestational diabetes have higher risks of developing high blood pressure during pregnancy because of the thick consistency of the blood. Hypertension during pregnancy, also known as preeclampsia, is a life-threatening condition for both the mother and the baby.

Based on the aforementioned effects, pregnant women should definitely care about their condition. Controlling blood sugar levels is of utmost importance to prevent any unwanted incidents. That being said, proper diet that is low in sugar and enough exercise should be practiced by women with gestational diabetes during pregnancy. If you want to learn more about the dietary recommendations for gestational diabetes and other related information, sign up for our newsletter.

What is the Difference Between Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational Diabetes?

What is the Difference Between Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational Diabetes?

Diabetes is a very common condition among the older population. Almost all people are familiar with this condition and they know that in order to manage this disease, one has to cut down on his/her sugar consumption. However, did you know that there are actually three types of diabetes? Although all three of them involve high blood sugar in the body, they have distinct differences that call for classification.

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Those who congenitally have diabetes are classified under type 1 diabetes. This is often dubbed as juvenile diabetes because it is most common among children. However, it can still be diagnosed among adults. This type of diabetes is an autoimmune condition that permanently destroys the beta cells in the pancreas, which are responsible for producing insulin. Hence, the body can no longer produce any insulin.

Symptoms for type 1 diabetes is the same as that of type 2—there is thirst, fatigue, and frequent urination. However, people with type 1 diabetes mellitus are usually thin as they tend to lose weight since glucose is not properly absorbed by the body.

Treatment for type 1 diabetes involves insulin therapy. People should also make permanent lifestyle changes, such as having a healthy diet and becoming physically active. If not controlled or treated, this condition can lead to several complications such as heart disease, kidney disease, retinopathy, and stroke.

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The most common and well-known type of diabetes is type 2 diabetes mellitus. It affects millions of people all over the world. Unlike type 1 diabetes, this type of diabetes is caused by lifestyle factors, such as being obese, having high blood pressure, and having high cholesterol. The beta cells of the pancreas still produce insulin, but this insulin is no longer effectively used by the body, thus resulting to insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. It is only during the advanced stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus that the beta cells can become damaged, hence resulting to insulin deficiency.

Treatment starts with diet modification and physical activity in order to lose weight. Oral hypoglycemic agents will be prescribed, and, depending on the severity of the illness, you may be asked to regularly monitor your blood sugar levels at home. If the oral medications are no longer working, you might also need to subject yourself to insulin therapy.

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes, as its name suggests, happens only to pregnant women and is diagnosed during the second or third trimester. This is caused by the hormonal changes happening in your body. The hormones that are made by the placenta resist insulin, thus letting glucose stay in your bloodstream. This then causes high blood sugar. Moreover, your insulin needs as a pregnant woman increases by two or three times than the normal insulin needs because of the growing fetus inside your womb. All these factors pile up, giving you a condition known as gestational diabetes.

Women with gestational diabetes should control their blood glucose levels, as high blood sugar can have detrimental effects on both the mother and the baby. It is important to monitor your blood glucose levels regularly and to practice eating healthy and engaging in physical activities.

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How is Gestational Diabetes Treated?

How is Gestational Diabetes Treated?

Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes is not the end of the world. Although the word “diabetes” might seem imposing to you since it is a chronic condition, remember that you can still do something about your condition because it only happens during pregnancy. Besides, it is of paramount importance that you do something about gestational diabetes so that it will not adversely affect your baby. To be able to cope with gestational diabetes in a healthy way, here are a few tips to get you started:

  • Keep your blood glucose levels in check. Your aim is to keep your blood glucose levels within normal range, just like those pregnant women without gestational diabetes. It is important that you know the normal values so that you can easily monitor your blood sugar levels. Your blood glucose level should be 95 mg/dl before meals. One hour after eating, it should be less than 140 mg/dl. It should go back to the normal range of 120 mg/dl or less two hours after eating. In order to monitor this, you would need a blood glucose monitor at home. This should be used at least once a day, or more frequently as needed.
  • Lose weight before you get pregnant. Just like type 2 diabetes, women who are most at risk for developing gestational diabetes are those who love to eat and are overweight. Therefore, those who are more than 20% their ideal body weight should start thinking about going on a diet. This does not only mean that you have to decrease the amount of food that you take. You should also consider making healthier choices, such as eating a vegetable salad instead of a whole chocolate bar. You should also limit your fat intake, as this would also benefit your baby. In addition, exercising is an important component of losing weight. Even though you are pregnant, you can still exercise as long as you first consult your doctor regarding the exercises that are safe for your condition.
  • Monitor your baby. Even if you do not have gestational diabetes, you have to go on pre-natal checkups at least once every trimester. For women with gestational diabetes, this should be done more frequently. Your doctor will monitor your baby’s movements through kick counts to know whether your baby is moving less than usual. Fetal ultrasounds will also be done to see how big your baby is growing, and whether or not your gestational diabetes already affects the growth of the baby. Your baby might also be subjected to a non-stress test to see how your baby’s heart responds to movement.
  • Take your prescribed medications. You have to make sure that you control your blood sugar levels. However, if your blood sugar remains uncontrolled, you should ask your doctor about taking insulin shots. The good thing about these is that insulin cannot cross the placental barrier, so your baby will not be affected by this medication. But before taking insulin shots, your doctor might first give you oral hypoglycemic agents to lower down your blood sugar levels. Avoid self-medicating and always ask your doctor about the safety of your child when taking any type of medication during pregnancy.

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Some Good Ways to Celebrate Spring with Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes Celebrating Spring

Gestational DiabetesNow that springtime is just around the corner, you might be wondering what activities you can do for this season. Remember, having gestational diabetes does not limit you to the things that you can do. There are still a lot of ways to enjoy this springtime, whether it be in terms of what you eat or what you do. In fact, this is the best time to fine tune your diabetes management plan because your mood is also probably at its best. Don’t be a bummer during springtime and indulge in the following activities and rejuvenating changes while the spirit of the season is still within you:

  • Take care of your feet. When you have any kind of diabetes, including gestational diabetes, your feet need to be showered with extra care to avoid developing diabetic feet. Spring is the best time to pamper your feet with a warm water soak that should not last for more than three minutes to avoid causing macerated skin. Also apply lotion to dry skin, but make sure that you do not leave moist areas, especially the area between your toes. Although you cannot indulge in a full-blown pedicure while you have gestational diabetes, you can still color your nails to get that springtime feeling.
  • Get out and walk. There is no better season to get out of the comfort of your own home and walk around your neighborhood than spring. The benefits of walking have been enumerated innumerable times already, and even if you are pregnant, this is still a great exercise for you. You can start by walking 20 minutes per day for at least three days per week. Just walk at the pace that your body is comfortable with. As your body gets used to the exercise, you can gradually increase your time and pace. Just make sure that you rest every few minutes, especially if you feel out of breath.
  • Eat fresh and keep hydrated. Springtime is also the season of lots of fresh fruits of vegetables that you can certainly indulge in. You can try a lot of unfamiliar fruits and veggies which contain a variety of vitamins and minerals that are good for you and for your baby. Just make sure that you watch the glucose content of what you eat. As for the hydration, good old water is still the best drink for you. You have to increase your water intake especially once the temperature starts to climb. Drinking eight glasses per day is good for women with gestational diabetes.
  • Volunteer for gestational diabetes. The best gift that you can give to other women suffering from gestational diabetes is your support. Make a difference by joining advocacy groups and sharing your experiences as someone with gestational diabetes. Not only will you learn a lot from these groups, but you will also be able to benefit them from your experiences and coping methods. Empowering other women with gestational diabetes will help them cope with their conditions.

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How Soon After I Have The Baby Should I Be Checked For Diabetes?

One of the worries that most women with gestational diabetes have in their minds is their condition after pregnancy and giving birth. Will they continue to have diabetes, or will their lifestyle be back to the way it was before they got pregnant? The answer is pretty simple: Your gestational diabetes will disappear once you are no longer pregnant. Otherwise, that would already be a case of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Now, the next question that would probably be plaguing your mind is this: How soon do I know this? In order for you to know the state of your blood glucose levels, you need to subject yourself to a postnatal check to determine if everything is okay with you and your baby.

The Postnatal Check

In reality, your pregnancy hormones will drop a few days after giving birth. Remember that these hormones are the ones responsible for the delay of glucose transportation from your bloodstream to your cells, hence causing gestational diabetes. However, you will only know this once you get a postnatal check.

Also known as the six-week check, your postnatal check will be done six to eight weeks after giving birth, or roughly two months after your delivery. You have to make an appointment with your doctor to have you and your baby checked.

If you had gestational diabetes during pregnancy, you may be asked to subject yourself to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during your postnatal check. Statistics show that one out of 50 women still have diabetes even after pregnancy, and this might mean that they had diabetes mellitus all along and they just had not realized this. Hence, this test will determine if your blood sugar levels have already returned to normal.

Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

This is the same test that you are being subjected to during the diagnosis stage of gestational diabetes. Before the test, you need to fast overnight. Check with your health care provider regarding the intake of your maintenance medications.

Once you arrive at the clinic, a blood sample will be taken from you. This sample will be the basis for the baseline test, since this will measure the blood glucose levels during fasting. Afterwards, you will be asked to drink a sweet and sugary mixture, which is equivalent to 75 grams of glucose. You have to drink the whole mixture, after which another blood sample will be collected two hours after drinking the mixture. This next blood sample will be compared to the baseline sample to see how high your sugar levels rose and whether or not it is within the normal range. Take note that you should not eat or drink anything within the two-hour waiting time. You can only eat after the second blood sample has been taken. The result will usually be ready 48 hours after the test.

If you get a positive result from the test, it is likely that you have already developed type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, a negative result means your gestational diabetes had gone away and you can resume your normal routine.

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Eating Right is Eating the Way You Want to Eat

The title of this article may seem conflicting to you. After all, how can you eat what you want if you have gestational diabetes? Although at first the dietary modifications that you need to employ may limit your food intake drastically, remember that this is not the goal of gestational diabetes treatment. You only need to lessen your carbohydrate intake so as not to increase your blood glucose levels. That means that you can still eat other foods as long as they do not spike up your sugar levels. Hence, you still have a pretty vast variety of foods that you can choose from.

Eating right means knowing what is good for you and choosing from the foods that you want to eat from those choices. To aid you in making healthy diabetic food choices, here are some tips for you to remember:

  • Choose complex high-fiber carbohydrates. If you love eating carbohydrates, you can still indulge in them even if you have gestational diabetes. It all boils down to what kind of carbohydrates you can eat. Generally speaking, you should only avoid those that contain refined carbohydrates, such as pasta, rice, and white bread. You also have to avoid those that contain simple sugars, like candy and soda. What you can eat are those known to be slow-release carbohydrates, which are so-called because they are digested slowly, thus letting your body control the blood glucose levels more easily. These are even advantageous because they make you feel full for a longer period of time. Choose alternatives to your favorite refined carbohydrates, such as brown rice instead of white rice, sweet potatoes instead of mashed and fried ones, and whole-wheat pastas and breads instead of the regular ones.
  • Watch out for your sweets. Although sweets contain simple sugars, it does not mean that you can never eat them during the duration of your gestational diabetes condition. Moderation is the key in eating these favorite desserts. At first, your sweet tooth habit may be hard to overcome, but it will get easier overtime once you keep on practicing healthy eating. Learn to compromise, like letting go of complex carbohydrate foods if you want to have some dessert. You should also learn to eat healthy fats, such as those found in yogurt and peanut butter. Also, sweets should be eaten as part of the meal to avoid spikes in blood sugar levels.
  • Eat healthy fats, not unhealthy ones. There are two kinds of fats – the unhealthy fats (saturated and trans fats) that can be found in whole milk dairy products, red meat, and eggs; and the healthy fats (unsaturated fats) coming from fish and plant sources. Of course, common sense dictates that you should eat more healthy fats, since these contain omega-3 fatty acids that are good for both your brain and heart. Those with gestational diabetes are also at risk for developing heart and brain complications.

Remember that eating smart is the key to eating right for women with gestational diabetes. If you want to learn more tips in eating the right foods for gestational diabetes, please sign up for our newsletter or Buy my book on Amazon, it is a complete gestational diabetes meal plan.