Diabetic Pregnancy Test

Diabetic Pregnancy Test – What Does it All Mean?

Women who are pregnant should go through a diabetic pregnancy test between weeks 24 and 28 of their pregnancy though, under certain circumstances, your physician may order the screening earlier during pregnancy. The purpose of the diabetic pregnancy test is to determine whether or not you have a condition known as gestational diabetes.

What is the Diabetic Pregnancy Test?

The test is fairly simple. You’ll be given a syrupy drink that tastes like a super-sweet orange soda. This drink contains 50g of glucose that is quickly absorbed into the blood. After an hour, you’ll have blood drawn from your arm and that blood will be tested to see how quickly the body metabolizes the glucose.

A follow-up diabetic pregnancy test, also referred to as a glucose tolerance test, is usually ordered if your glucose levels are greater than 130mg/dL. The follow-up test will require you to fast (eat no food) prior to taking the test and is often administered early in the morning as a result.

This diabetic pregnancy test is more involved and results in four blood draws over a three-hour period of time. If the results of at least two of the four blood draws are abnormal, the diagnosis is one of gestational diabetes.

What does it mean to have Gestational Diabetes?

When the results of your diabetic pregnancy test indicate gestational diabetes your doctor will then determine if dietary changes should be adequate to help you recover or if more direct intervention is necessary. Early in pregnancy, most women can control blood sugar levels with dietary chances and exercises. As the pregnancy progresses and hormones begin to build up, more direct intervention in the form of pills or insulin shots may be required.

The goal of the diabetic pregnancy test is to get your blood sugar levels under control so that you can avoid certain complications that may result from high blood sugar including high birth weight in the baby, high bilirubin levels, extra red blood cells, and low blood calcium levels for the baby.

Are there Other Concerns Regarding Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes affects about 18 percent of pregnant women. Some women, depending on family history, weight, age, pregnancy history, and ethnic group; are more susceptible to developing this condition. According to the CDC, women who have gestational diabetes are at an increased risk (35-60 percent increase) of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 to 20 years. Education is critical in avoiding this outcome, which is another reason the diabetic pregnancy test is so import — to serve as a warning ahead of the fact.

Even if your diabetic pregnancy test determines that you have gestational diabetes, it isn’t a guarantee that you’ll eventually develop type two diabetes. It is a sign, however, that now is a good time to begin making changes in your diet and fitness routine to reduce that risk. Start following a diabetic friendly diet while pregnant and continue following the diet afterwards to reduce your risks of developing diabetes and the complications that often go along with it.

MATHEA FORD-REGISTERED DIETITIAN AND AUTHOR

Diabetic Pregnancy Test

Gestational Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels

How to Determine Your Gestational Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels

Gestational Diabetes Blood Sugar LevelsGestational diabetes is a condition in which a pregnant woman’s blood sugar levels get elevated. It is important to keep your gestational diabetes blood sugar levels in check in order for both you and your baby to stay healthy and to avoid complications during delivery and later on in life. Normally, gestational diabetes is diagnosed late in the pregnancy, usually between weeks 24 and 28, because this is the time when symptoms become apparent. Obstetricians employ routine screening for gestational diabetes, like the initial glucose challenge test and the glucose tolerance test, in order to diagnose the condition and check your blood sugar levels.

Determining Gestational Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels

As previously mentioned, there are two ways to determine if you have high gestational diabetes blood sugar levels. These tests involve checking your blood to see if the glucose levels are within acceptable range. The first test would be the initial glucose challenge test, in which you will be asked to drink a syrupy glucose solution. An hour after drinking it, a blood sample will be extracted in order to measure your gestational diabetes blood sugar levels. If your blood sugar levels are below 130 to 140 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl), you don’t have gestational diabetes, since this is the normal range for gestational diabetes blood sugar levels. However, if your blood sugar levels are higher than those values, it does not automatically mean that you have gestational diabetes. It only means that you have higher risk of developing gestational diabetes, and a second confirmatory follow-up test is necessary.

The second and confirmatory test for determining gestational diabetes blood sugar levels is known as the glucose tolerance test. For this test, you will be asked to fast overnight before your blood sugar levels will be measured. During the day of the test, you will again be asked to drink a syrupy glucose solution, but this time with a higher concentration of glucose. Your gestational diabetes blood sugar levels will then be checked every hour for a period of three hours. If at least two blood sugar readings are higher than the normal range, you will then be diagnosed as having gestational diabetes. The normal gestational diabetes blood sugar levels are below or equal to 95 mg/dl or lower for fasting, 180 mg/dl after one hour, 155 mg/dl after two hours, and 140 mg/dl after three hours.

Monitoring Gestational Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels

Management of blood sugar levels throughout pregnancy is important to avoid any complications. This can be done through eating a balanced diet and cutting back on foods that are high in sugar. Physical activity is also necessary during pregnancy to maintain healthy gestational diabetes blood sugar levels, although strenuous exercise should be avoided. It is also important to monitor your gestational diabetes blood sugar levels to make sure that your treatment plan is effective. This can be done through the use of blood glucose meters. For those who have uncontrollably high gestational diabetes blood sugar levels, insulin treatment may be needed. You also need to regular follow-up checkups with your doctor to make sure that you maintain normal gestational diabetes blood sugar levels.

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3-Hour Gestational Diabetes Test

In order to make sure that a pregnant woman has gestational diabetes, she needs to undergo the 3-hour gestational diabetes test. This test measures the body’s ability to use glucose, thus diagnosing prediabetes and diabetes. It is a very common test that is used for determining whether one has gestational diabetes or not.

Pregnant women have increased chances for having a high 3-hour gestational diabetes test if she was previously diagnosed with gestational diabetes in a past pregnancy. She is also at risk for the condition if she previously gave birth to a baby weighing nine pounds or 4.1 kilograms. Those who are overweight and younger than 25 years old are also at higher risk of getting an abnormal 3-hour gestational diabetes test result.

Preparing for the 3-Hour Gestational Diabetes Test

Before you undergo the 3-hour gestational diabetes test, your doctor will advise you to have a diet containing at least 150 grams of carbohydrates for the three days prior to fasting. Carbohydrate-rich foods include cereals, breads, grains, fruits, rice, crackers, potatoes, and corn. Eight to 14 hours before the test, you are not allowed to drink or eat anything. You are also discouraged from exercising or smoking because these can affect the results of the 3-hour gestational diabetes test. Some medications may also affect the test, so it is important to tell your doctor about them so that he can tell you whether those drugs can affect the test or not.

How the 3-Hour Gestational Diabetes Test is Done

During the duration of the 3-hour gestational diabetes test, you will be asked to sit quietly since physical activity can have an effect on the test. You are also not allowed to drink or eat anything during the duration of the test, other than water and the solution that will be given to you for consumption.

Upon arrival, your fasting blood sample will be collected. This will serve as the baseline for the rest of the results that will be collected during the 3-hour gestational diabetes test. You will then be asked to drink 75 grams of a sweet, glucose-filled syrupy liquid. Several blood samples will be extracted after one, two, or three hours. Although it is best to drink the liquid in one go, you might feel sick and nauseous and might feel the need to vomit, which will only prevent you from accomplishing the 3-hour gestational diabetes test. Therefore, it is advised that you drink the liquid at your own pace.

Results of the 3-Hour Gestational Diabetes Test

The normal values for the 3-hour gestational diabetes test are as follows. It is measured in milligrams per deciliters (mg/dl).

  • Fasting glucose – less than 95 mg/dl
  • One hour later – less than 180 mg/dl
  • Two hours later – less than 155 mg/dl
  • Three hours later – less than 140 mg/dl

If your 3-hour gestational diabetes test results go over these values, you will be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Diagnosis is important in order to manage gestational diabetes properly and help prevent complications to you and your baby.

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3-hour gestational diabetes test

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What Will My Baby Weigh With Gestational Diabetes?- Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Because gestational diabetes is a condition affecting pregnant women, this condition can also affect the babies of these women. As such, this might pose several complications for the baby, including increased birth weight, labor difficulties, hypoglycemia after birth, and risk for developing diabetes later on in life.

“Big” Baby-Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Remember that glucose can cross the placental barrier, and too much glucose can make your baby fat. One of the complications that babies can have if gestational diabetes remains uncontrolled is macrosomia or a big baby. Macrosomia is defined as having a birth weight of 4500 grams or more. That translates to a weight of 9 pounds and 14 ounces, when the normal birth weight is only around 3400 grams.

Baby Weight With Gestational DiabetesAs a result of the weight of the baby, this might further lead to several complications. If the baby achieves this weight at around the seventh week of pregnancy, this might prompt obstetricians to deliver the baby prematurely since staying in the womb for a longer period of time poses some danger to the mother, such as possible uterine rupture. The baby will then have to be placed inside an incubator since his lung surfactants have not yet fully matured. Baby weight with gestational diabetes is directly related to blood sugar control in the mother.

If the baby reaches full term, the huge birth weight can still pose a problem on labor and delivery. Labor may be difficult since the baby will probably not be able to pass through the vaginal canal. Hence, Caesarean section would be recommended. If the mother pushes through with normal spontaneous delivery, there is a risk for the baby to have shoulder dystocia or shoulder fracture. Usually, the baby’s head is the biggest part of his body. However, for macrosomic babies, the shoulders become wider than the head, thus not being able to pass through swiftly into the birth canal. Although the shoulder fracture can easily heal because the babes bones are still soft and not yet fully formed, improper alignment can lead to bone defects as the baby grows older.

Other Complications-Baby Weight With Gestational Diabetes

Aside from possible injuries during delivery, the baby can also suffer from hypoglycemia immediately after delivery. The baby has gotten used to high glucose levels inside the womb. As a result, his pancreas responds by producing high levels of insulin to use up all the glucose coming from the mother. When the baby is born, the pancreas will still continue to produce high amounts of insulin as it still takes some time to get used to the outside environment. As a result, the baby can suffer from hypoglycemia or low blood sugar during his first few days of life. This should be carefully monitored by health care providers.

Studies also show that babies borne out of gestational diabetic mothers have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus later on in life. However, if you control your blood sugar properly during pregnancy, this risk could be lessened. Therefore, proper treatment and control of gestational diabetes is very important.

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Why Should I Care if I Have Gestational Diabetes?

Why Should I Care if I Have Gestational Diabetes?

Since gestational diabetes only occurs to pregnant women, most women have no idea what this means. Although many are familiar with what diabetes is in general, they do not know what to expect when it comes to gestational diabetes. Questions plague the mind of a woman who is newly-diagnosed with gestational diabetes: Is it the same as the common type 2 diabetes? What are its effects on me and my baby? Should I be alarmed? Should I even care? The answer to the last question is very simple: Yes, you should care. Just like any other types of diseases, you should take some precautionary measures if you are diagnosed with this condition. In order to help you understand the gravity to the situation, here are some information on what gestational diabetes is.

What is gestational diabetes?

Gestational diabetes is a condition that manifests only during pregnancy. Just like the more commonly known diabetes type 2, gestational diabetes involves an increase in blood glucose or sugar levels. This is because the body cannot produce adequate amounts of insulin to match the glucose intake of the pregnant woman, since a pregnant woman’s insulin needs is multiplied to two or three times the normal insulin requirement. Moreover, a pregnant woman releases certain hormones that antagonize the action of insulin. Hence, control of blood sugar is important for women with gestational diabetes.

What are the effects of gestational diabetes?

So what if you have gestational diabetes? Remember that since you are carrying a child in your womb, this means that the effects of gestational diabetes might not only manifest on you, but also on your child. Glucose can cross the placental barrier since this is the main source of nutrients for your growing fetus. The child of a mother with gestational diabetes tends to be larger in size because of the amount of glucose that they get. This can pose some problems during delivery. If the baby is already too large before it becomes term, this might prompt the doctor to deliver the baby prematurely. If the baby reaches full term, s/he may be delivered via Caesarean section because s/he cannot fit inside the birth canal. Normal spontaneous delivery might injure the baby. Moreover, your baby can have periods of hypoglycemia during his/her first few days since his/her pancreas have gotten used to producing large amounts of insulin while still in the womb.

You can become affected as well. Those who have gestational diabetes have higher risks of developing high blood pressure during pregnancy because of the thick consistency of the blood. Hypertension during pregnancy, also known as preeclampsia, is a life-threatening condition for both the mother and the baby.

Based on the aforementioned effects, pregnant women should definitely care about their condition. Controlling blood sugar levels is of utmost importance to prevent any unwanted incidents. That being said, proper diet that is low in sugar and enough exercise should be practiced by women with gestational diabetes during pregnancy. If you want to learn more about the dietary recommendations for gestational diabetes and other related information, sign up for our newsletter.

My One Hour Glucose Tolerance Test Reading Was High

My One Hour Glucose Tolerance Test was High

Do I Have Gestational Diabetes?

Once you are suspected to have gestational diabetes, you will be subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test to determine whether or not you really have gestational diabetes. For most women who are going to undergo this test, this can be nerve-racking as they do not know what to expect. Hence, it is very important to educate yourself regarding the glucose tolerance test so that you know the preparation, the procedure, and the normal values for the test results. This will also prevent you from subjecting yourself to undue stress that might adversely affect your baby.

What is the one hour glucose tolerance test?

The oral glucose tolerance test, also known as the one-hour glucose challenge test, is administered between weeks 24 and 28 of your pregnancy. This test will initially determine whether or not you are at risk for developing gestational diabetes. The results of this test are not conclusive, for a high value is still subject to a confirmatory test, the three-hour glucose tolerance test. A high value in this test means that you indeed have gestational diabetes.

How do I prepare for the one hour glucose tolerance test?

For the one-hour glucose tolerance test, there is no preparation required. You can take it right there and then since no fasting is needed. However, if you are going to undergo the three-hour glucose tolerance test, you need to fast for 10 to 14 hours before the test. You should also refrain from drinking or eating anything during the three-hour duration of the test.

What happens in the one hour glucose tolerance test?

one hour glucose tolerance testIn the one-hour oral glucose tolerance test, you will be asked to drink a sugary beverage that contains 50 grams of glucose. After finishing the drink, your doctor will wait for one hour before testing your blood glucose levels. During this one hour, you cannot eat or drink anything. After one hour, your doctor will extract a blood sample from you and compare your values with that of the normal range. If your blood sugar level is less than 130 mg/dl, this means that you do not have gestational diabetes and you will not be subjected to any more tests. However, once the value exceeds 130 mg/dl, you might have gestational diabetes, but the doctor needs to make sure first. Hence, you will be subjected to the three-hour glucose tolerance test. This means that the results of the one-hour glucose tolerance test only determine the possibility of having gestational diabetes, but they do not establish the fact that you really have gestational diabetes.

Once you are subjected to the three-hour glucose tolerance test, your doctor will first draw a blood sample after your 14-hour fasting. Next, you will be asked to drink a sugary liquid containing 100 grams of glucose, then have your blood samples taken one, two, and three hours after finishing the drink. This means that your blood sample will be taken for a total of four times. The normal values for this test should be 95 mg/dl for your fasting blood sugar, 180 mg/dl after one hour, 155 mg/dl for two hours, and 140 mg/dl for three hours. Any two values exceeding this range confirm your condition of gestational diabetes.

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How is Gestational Diabetes Treated?

How is Gestational Diabetes Treated?

Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes is not the end of the world. Although the word “diabetes” might seem imposing to you since it is a chronic condition, remember that you can still do something about your condition because it only happens during pregnancy. Besides, it is of paramount importance that you do something about gestational diabetes so that it will not adversely affect your baby. To be able to cope with gestational diabetes in a healthy way, here are a few tips to get you started:

  • Keep your blood glucose levels in check. Your aim is to keep your blood glucose levels within normal range, just like those pregnant women without gestational diabetes. It is important that you know the normal values so that you can easily monitor your blood sugar levels. Your blood glucose level should be 95 mg/dl before meals. One hour after eating, it should be less than 140 mg/dl. It should go back to the normal range of 120 mg/dl or less two hours after eating. In order to monitor this, you would need a blood glucose monitor at home. This should be used at least once a day, or more frequently as needed.
  • Lose weight before you get pregnant. Just like type 2 diabetes, women who are most at risk for developing gestational diabetes are those who love to eat and are overweight. Therefore, those who are more than 20% their ideal body weight should start thinking about going on a diet. This does not only mean that you have to decrease the amount of food that you take. You should also consider making healthier choices, such as eating a vegetable salad instead of a whole chocolate bar. You should also limit your fat intake, as this would also benefit your baby. In addition, exercising is an important component of losing weight. Even though you are pregnant, you can still exercise as long as you first consult your doctor regarding the exercises that are safe for your condition.
  • Monitor your baby. Even if you do not have gestational diabetes, you have to go on pre-natal checkups at least once every trimester. For women with gestational diabetes, this should be done more frequently. Your doctor will monitor your baby’s movements through kick counts to know whether your baby is moving less than usual. Fetal ultrasounds will also be done to see how big your baby is growing, and whether or not your gestational diabetes already affects the growth of the baby. Your baby might also be subjected to a non-stress test to see how your baby’s heart responds to movement.
  • Take your prescribed medications. You have to make sure that you control your blood sugar levels. However, if your blood sugar remains uncontrolled, you should ask your doctor about taking insulin shots. The good thing about these is that insulin cannot cross the placental barrier, so your baby will not be affected by this medication. But before taking insulin shots, your doctor might first give you oral hypoglycemic agents to lower down your blood sugar levels. Avoid self-medicating and always ask your doctor about the safety of your child when taking any type of medication during pregnancy.

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Some Good Ways to Celebrate Spring with Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes Celebrating Spring

Gestational DiabetesNow that springtime is just around the corner, you might be wondering what activities you can do for this season. Remember, having gestational diabetes does not limit you to the things that you can do. There are still a lot of ways to enjoy this springtime, whether it be in terms of what you eat or what you do. In fact, this is the best time to fine tune your diabetes management plan because your mood is also probably at its best. Don’t be a bummer during springtime and indulge in the following activities and rejuvenating changes while the spirit of the season is still within you:

  • Take care of your feet. When you have any kind of diabetes, including gestational diabetes, your feet need to be showered with extra care to avoid developing diabetic feet. Spring is the best time to pamper your feet with a warm water soak that should not last for more than three minutes to avoid causing macerated skin. Also apply lotion to dry skin, but make sure that you do not leave moist areas, especially the area between your toes. Although you cannot indulge in a full-blown pedicure while you have gestational diabetes, you can still color your nails to get that springtime feeling.
  • Get out and walk. There is no better season to get out of the comfort of your own home and walk around your neighborhood than spring. The benefits of walking have been enumerated innumerable times already, and even if you are pregnant, this is still a great exercise for you. You can start by walking 20 minutes per day for at least three days per week. Just walk at the pace that your body is comfortable with. As your body gets used to the exercise, you can gradually increase your time and pace. Just make sure that you rest every few minutes, especially if you feel out of breath.
  • Eat fresh and keep hydrated. Springtime is also the season of lots of fresh fruits of vegetables that you can certainly indulge in. You can try a lot of unfamiliar fruits and veggies which contain a variety of vitamins and minerals that are good for you and for your baby. Just make sure that you watch the glucose content of what you eat. As for the hydration, good old water is still the best drink for you. You have to increase your water intake especially once the temperature starts to climb. Drinking eight glasses per day is good for women with gestational diabetes.
  • Volunteer for gestational diabetes. The best gift that you can give to other women suffering from gestational diabetes is your support. Make a difference by joining advocacy groups and sharing your experiences as someone with gestational diabetes. Not only will you learn a lot from these groups, but you will also be able to benefit them from your experiences and coping methods. Empowering other women with gestational diabetes will help them cope with their conditions.

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How Soon After I Have The Baby Should I Be Checked For Diabetes?

One of the worries that most women with gestational diabetes have in their minds is their condition after pregnancy and giving birth. Will they continue to have diabetes, or will their lifestyle be back to the way it was before they got pregnant? The answer is pretty simple: Your gestational diabetes will disappear once you are no longer pregnant. Otherwise, that would already be a case of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Now, the next question that would probably be plaguing your mind is this: How soon do I know this? In order for you to know the state of your blood glucose levels, you need to subject yourself to a postnatal check to determine if everything is okay with you and your baby.

The Postnatal Check

In reality, your pregnancy hormones will drop a few days after giving birth. Remember that these hormones are the ones responsible for the delay of glucose transportation from your bloodstream to your cells, hence causing gestational diabetes. However, you will only know this once you get a postnatal check.

Also known as the six-week check, your postnatal check will be done six to eight weeks after giving birth, or roughly two months after your delivery. You have to make an appointment with your doctor to have you and your baby checked.

If you had gestational diabetes during pregnancy, you may be asked to subject yourself to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during your postnatal check. Statistics show that one out of 50 women still have diabetes even after pregnancy, and this might mean that they had diabetes mellitus all along and they just had not realized this. Hence, this test will determine if your blood sugar levels have already returned to normal.

Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

This is the same test that you are being subjected to during the diagnosis stage of gestational diabetes. Before the test, you need to fast overnight. Check with your health care provider regarding the intake of your maintenance medications.

Once you arrive at the clinic, a blood sample will be taken from you. This sample will be the basis for the baseline test, since this will measure the blood glucose levels during fasting. Afterwards, you will be asked to drink a sweet and sugary mixture, which is equivalent to 75 grams of glucose. You have to drink the whole mixture, after which another blood sample will be collected two hours after drinking the mixture. This next blood sample will be compared to the baseline sample to see how high your sugar levels rose and whether or not it is within the normal range. Take note that you should not eat or drink anything within the two-hour waiting time. You can only eat after the second blood sample has been taken. The result will usually be ready 48 hours after the test.

If you get a positive result from the test, it is likely that you have already developed type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, a negative result means your gestational diabetes had gone away and you can resume your normal routine.

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Fruits and Vegetables Gestational Diabetes-Common Portion Sizes of Carbohydrate Choices

Fruits and Vegetables Gestational Diabetes

In gestational diabetes, it is important that you control what you eat. This does not necessarily mean that you should avoid eating certain foods. On the contrary, you can eat any type of food that you want, provided that you do so in moderation. This is to avoid raising your blood sugar levels to uncontrollable heights. The important thing is to keep a balanced diet with all the nutrients still present in your meal so that both you and your baby can grow healthy. On your diet try fruits and vegetables gestational diabetes!

That being said, carbohydrates are very important parts of your meal. It will give you the energy to do your daily activities, although too much of it can raise your blood sugar levels. Therefore, here are the serving sizes for fruits and vegetables.

Each fruit here contains 15 grams of carbohydrates:

Fruits

Size of One Serving

Apple, orange, pear, or peach 1 small piece the size of a tennis ball
Banana or mango ½ piece
Grapefruit 1 large piece
Small grapes 17 pieces
Honeydew or cantaloupe 1 cup
Raisins 2 tablespoons
Unsweetened, canned fruit ½ cup
Papaya or watermelon 1 cup cubed
Apple, orange, or grapefruit juice ½ cup
Applesauce ½ cup
Fresh blueberries or blackberries ¾ cup
Kiwi fruit 1 piece
Dried fruit ¼ cup
Fresh strawberries 1 ¼ cup
Lemon 1 large piece
Nectarine 1 cup
Diced pineapple ¾ cup
Canned pineapple 1/3 cup
Raspberries 1 cup
Fresh cherries 12 pieces
Dates 3 pieces
Figs 2 small pieces
Plum 2 pieces
Diced rhubarb 3 cups
Low-calorie cranberry juice 10 ounces
Unsweetened orange, grape, or pineapple juice 4 ounces
Unsweetened lemon juice 6 ounces

 

On the other hand, each vegetable here contains 5 grams of carbohydrates:

Vegetables

Size of One Serving

Raw broccoli 1 cup
Cooked broccoli ½ cup
Spinach and other greens 1 cup
Raw cauliflower 1 cup
Raw carrots 1 cup
Fresh pepper 1 cup
Canned tomato ½ cup
Leafy vegetables 1 cup
Tomato sauce 2 tablespoons
Vegetable or tomato juice 1 cup
Chopped asparagus 1 cup
Bamboo shoots, beans, Brussels sprouts, or bean sprouts ½ cup
Cabbage, celery, collard greens, green beans, fresh mushrooms, mustard greens, radishes, or squash 1 cup
Chili pepper 5 small pieces
Turnips, kale, leeks, okra, onion, sauerkraut, scallions, or rutabagas ½ cup

Take note that vegetables contain 1/3 of the carbohydrate of a regular serving of any other carbohydrate.  You can eat 3 times as much of them as other carbohydrates for the same 15 gm.  Vegetables and whole fruits also contain more fiber and keep you feeling full longer than other foods, so they are an important part of your overall plan to reduce your blood sugar.

Tips on Including Fruits and Vegetables in your Diet- Fruits and Vegetables Gestational Diabetes

  • Eat vegetables with only little or no fat, dressings, or sauces.
  • If you want to have salad dressing, choose the low-fat type.
  • You can also steam vegetables using low-fat broth.
  • When cooking vegetables, add a small piece of smoked turkey or lean ham instead of fat.
  • Sprinkle herbs and spices on your vegetable salad because these flavorings have almost no fat or calories.
  • If you do use fat in cooking vegetables, choose soft margarine, olive oil, or canola oil.
  • Eat smaller pieces of fruit rather than make them into juices.
  • If you are going to make a fruit juice, do not add any more sugar.

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